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Finding Data: Data on Religion

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • Selected Resources for:

    Religion - Non USA ::

  • American Mosaic Project: A National Survey on Diversity
    Multiyear, multi-method study of the bases of solidarity and diversity in American life. Designed to gather data on attitudes about race, religion, politics and American identity as well as demographic information and social networks. Also available through ICPSR.

  • American Muslims Poll (2001)

  • American Muslims Poll (2004)
    Conducted by Zogby Group International for The Project MAPS: Muslims in American Public Square, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding (CMCU). Topics include politics, voting behavior, terrorism, patriotism, the Middle East, community and interfaith activities, images of Islam and attitudes towards Muslims, important issues, and Islam. Also included in Roper IPOLL.

    Sample Size: 1,781 Muslim American adults.

  • American National Election Studies (ANES)
    Oldest continuous series of survey data investigating electoral behavior and attitudes in the United States. The focus includes voter perceptions of the major political parties, the candidates, national and international issues, and of the importance of the election. Also explored are voter expectations about the outcome of the election, degree of voter interest in politics, political affiliation and voting history, as well as participation in the electoral process. ANES interviews are conducted before and after presidential elections and after national congressional elections. Post-election interviews include questions on actual voting behavior and voter reflections about the election outcome. See the Help Center for overviews. Also available through ICPSR.

  • Americans' Changing Lives: Waves I-V (1986, 1989, 1994, 2002, and 2011)
    Focusing especially on differences between black and white Americans in middle & late life, these data constitute the first 5 waves in a national longitudinal panel survey covering a wide range of sociological, psychological, mental, and physical health items. Among the topics covered are interpersonal relationships (spouse/partner, children, parents, friends), sources and levels of satisfaction, social interactions and leisure activities, traumatic life events (physical assault, serious illness, divorce, death of a loved one, financial or legal problems), perceptions of retirement, health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight, rest), and utilization of health care services (doctor visits, hospitalization, nursing home institutionalization, bed days). Also included are measures of physical health, psychological well-being, and indices referring to cognitive functioning. Background information provided for individuals includes household composition, number of children and grandchildren, employment status, occupation and work history, income, family financial situation, religious beliefs and practices, ethnicity, race, education, sex, and region of residence.

  • Arts and Religion Survey (1999)
    Offers information on Americans' opinions about the role of the arts relative to religion.

  • Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA)
    Major archive for data on religion. Holds numerous international surveys on religion, including general population surveys, surveys of selected religious groups, surveys of religious professionals, and aggregate church, congregational and denominational data. Notable datasets include:
    • Anti-Semitism in the United States- Results of the 1981 study may be compared to the 1964 study.
    • Churches and Church Membership in the United States - Self-report forms were completed by all participating religious bodies. Data is available on a state level basis for 1952, 1971, 1980, and 1990 as well as a county level basis (1952, 1971, 1980, and 1990).
    • Cooperative Clergy Study Project Examines political beliefs, political involvement, community involvement, and religious beliefs of clergy.
    • Gallup Poll of Catholics - Interviews were conducted in 1987, 1992, 1993, 1999, and 2005.
    • National Survey of Youth and Religion (NSYR) -- nationally representative telephone survey of 3,290 English & Spanish-speaking teenagers between the ages of 13-17, and their parents. Also includes 80 oversampled Jewish households, not nationally representative, bringing the total number of completed cases to 3,370. Purpose is to research the shape & influence of religion & spirituality in the lives of American youth; to identify effective practices in the religious, moral, and social formation of the lives of youth; to describe the extent & perceived effectiveness of the programs & opportunities that religious communities are offering to their youth; and to foster an informed national discussion about the influence of religion in youth's lives, in order to encourage sustained reflection about and rethinking of our cultural and institutional practices with regard to youth & religion. The 2nd wave was designed to be a re-interview of all Wave 1 youth survey respondents. Parents of the youth respondents were not re-interviewed. At the time of the 2nd survey, respondents were between the ages of 16-21. Conducted from June 9-November 24, 2005. 2nd wave interviews were conducted only in English. Four youth respondents did not participate in the Wave 2 interview due to not being able to understand or speak English. Wave 2 covers many of the same topics as Wave 1. Many of the questions are identical. However, Wave 2 was re-designed to take into account changes in the lives of the respondents as they began to enter young adulthood. Wave 2 included new questions pertaining to behaviors occurring during the transition to adulthood, such as non-marital cohabitation, educational and career aspirations, pregnancy and marriage. In Wave 3 every attempt was made to re-interview all English-speaking Wave 1 youth survey respondents. At the time of the 3rd survey, respondents were between the ages of 18-24. Conducted from September 24, 2007-April 21, 2008. Wave 3 replicated many of the questions asked in Waves 1 & 2 with some changes made to better capture the respondents' lives as they grew older. For example, there were fewer questions on parental monitoring and more on post-high school educational aspirations.
    • Middletown Area Studies - Data were collected from 1978 to 2004. Assessed the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. Included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics.
    • Presbyterian data - Includes the Presbyterian Panel, Faith Communities Today, and the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. Long running surveys dating back to 1973.
    • Southern Focus Polls - Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.
    • Survey of American Catholic Priests - Priests were surveyed about satisfaction with their training, their Presbyteral Council, and particularly their priestly ministry. Topics include their views on church authority, the role of the laity, the challenges of the priestly life, public perceptions of the priesthood, and sexuality. Survey results for 1985, 1993, and 2001 are available.
    • System for Catholic Research, Information and Planning - The aim was to develop a dataset describing the U.S. Catholic Church at the diocesan level. Diocesan information collected from Church and other sources were merged with U.S. Census data describing population and other characteristics of the counties that make up each diocese. The total project consists of six decades worth of data -- 1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990.
    • U.S. Congregational Life Survey (2001, 2008/2009, 2011) - Over 500,000 worshipers in over 5,000 congregations across America participated in the 2 waves of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregation's facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Data sets are supplied for Southern Baptist, United Methodist, and Presbyterian faiths.

  • Baylor Religion Surveys (2005, 2007)
    Nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services.

  • Building Strong Families (BSF) Project Data Collection, 2005-2008, United States
    Examined the effectiveness of programs designed to improve child well-being and strengthen the relationships of low-income couples through relationship skills education. Surveyed couples 15 months after having applied and having been accepted into a BSF program at one of 8 locations offering services to unwed couples expecting, or having recently had a baby. The 1st major focus of the study was family structure. Question topics included information on recently born children, as well as the parents and their relationship status. If the parents were still together, respondents were asked whether they were currently married or planned to marry in the future. If no longer together, reasons for the relationship ending were explored. The 2nd major focus queried respondents about parental involvement with their child or children. They were then asked to rate their perceived quality as parents, their communication skills, and cooperation between parental responsibilities. Respondents were also questioned regarding the amount of time spent by each parent with their child, including playing games, feeding, and changing diapers. The 3rd major focus asked respondents about their relationships. They were asked to give their opinions of marriage and their level of satisfaction in their current relationship. Respondents were also asked to list the frequency, if applicable, of various occurrences within their relationship. Subjects included communication, enjoyment of each others' company, partner reliability, infidelity, and domestic violence. The 4th major focus queried respondents on their well-being. They were asked whether they attended religious services, how they felt in the past month about being a parent, and their feelings and behavior during the past week. Respondents were further asked if these feelings or problems made it difficult for them to work or communicate with other people. They were also asked about consumption of alcoholic beverages in the past year, and if alcohol use created problems with employment. The 5th major focus questioned respondents about the utilization of various services. They were asked if they participated in any programs such as classes, workshops, or group sessions in order to help their relationship. They were also asked if they had met with someone, such as a social worker or a priest, to help them work on their relationship. Respondents were asked if they participated in programs to improve parenting skills, learn job skills, increase education, or find employment. They were also asked if they participated in any programs to help with anger management or domestic violence. The 6th major focus dealt with paternity and child support. Respondents were asked if they voluntarily signed a birth certificate or document identifying them as the mother or father. They were asked if they were legally required to provide child support, the amount of that support, and if they gave money in addition to child support to help with the cost of raising the child or children. The 7th major focus dealt with family self-sufficiency. Respondents were asked if they or their partner performed any work for pay during the past year, the past month, and their earnings during those times. They were then asked if they received any additional sources of income such as welfare, disability insurance, and unemployment. Respondents were then asked if they and their partner combined some, all, or none of their money. They were asked how the responsibility for bill payment was divided between partners and if, at any point, they had difficulty paying bills. Respondents were also asked if they owned a car, rented or owned a home, and whether they were covered by health insurance. Lastly they were asked about their health and who they could count on in an emergency. The final major focus explored parental well-being. Respondents were asked if they were currently in prison or jail, had ever been arrested, had served a jail or prison sentence in the past and, if so, how long they were incarcerated. Additional information collected included country of origin of the respondent and the respondent's parents, who they spent most of their life with prior to age 18, whether they lived with both of their biological parents at the same time, and if their parents were married. Respondents were also asked about their previous sexual experience. Demographic data includes race, education level, age, income, and marital status.

  • Changing Faiths: Latinos and the Transformation of American Religion (2006 Hispanic Religion Survey)
    In order to explore the complex nature of religion among Latinos, the Pew Hispanic Center and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life collaborated on a set of public opinion surveys.

  • Christian Nonprofit Organizations, 2005
    These data represent almost 2,000 of the largest parachurch Christian nonprofit organizations based in the United States. The data were built using forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service in 2005. Variables include measures of revenue, expenses, activities and religious identity as measured by the organization's statement of purpose.

  • Ethno-Linguistic Situation in the Parishes of U.S. Orthodox Christian Churches
    Goal was to assess the usage of various languages and the strength of the ethnic culture in U.S. Orthodox parishes. Includes parishes from different parts of the United States and from various Orthodox jurisdictions.

  • Faith Matters Survey 2006
    National survey interviewed roughly 3100 Americans in an hour-long phone survey both about their religion (beliefs, belonging and behavior) and their social and political engagement.

  • General Social Survey (1972-2014) (GSS)
    Produced biennially since 1994, the GSS is a long running survey of social, cultural and political indicators. In addition to the GSS, topic modules, designed to investigate new issues or to expand the coverage of an existing subject, are administered. Examples of topic modules include computer and Internet, racial and ethnic prejudice, and child mental-health stigma. The GSS has participated since 1985 in the International Social Survey Program. A listing of modules is available.

    Sample Size: Over the life of the survey, more than 43,000 respondents, with about 3,000 added biennially.

  • General Social Survey Topical Module 1991, 1998: Religion
    Conducted in conjunction with the International Social Survey Program.

  • Houston Area Survey (1982+)
    Longitudinal study that began in May 1982 after Houston recovered from recession of the mid-1980s. Measures the public responses to the new economic, educational, and environmental challenges. Measured perspectives on the local and national economy, on poverty programs, inter-ethnic relationships. Also captured were respondents' beliefs about discrimination and affirmative action, education, crime, health care, taxation, and community service, as well as their assessments of downtown development, mobility and transit, land-use controls, and environmental concerns, and their attitudes toward abortion, homosexuality, and other aspects of the social agenda. Also recorded were religious and political orientations, as well as an array of demographic and immigration characteristics, socioeconomic indicators, and family structures.

  • Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group Study
    Aims to inform policy-makers of the impact of Hurricane Katrina on survivors' physical and mental health and barriers to treatment, as well as assist in future natural disaster planning efforts. This will be achieved by monitoring, over time, a group of people who represent those affected by Katrina. The Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group consists of a broad cross-section of people affected by Katrina, including separate samples of people who resided in the New Orleans metropolitan area at the time of the hurricane and those who resided in the counties or parishes of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi that were in the path of the hurricane. Follow-up interviews conducted with the Advisory Group members to monitor the pace of recovery, as well as reports prepared for policy-makers, press releases, and digitally recorded oral histories are being posted on the Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group Web site as they become available. Demographic variables include gender, age, race, ethnicity, pre-hurricane residence (place), pre-hurricane type of housing (detached home, mobile home, apartment, etc.), pre-hurricane employment, family income, marital status, education, home ownership (owned with mortgage, owned without mortgage, rented, etc.), where the respondent lived at time of interview, religious preference, and religiosity.

  • International Social Survey Program (ISSP) (1985+)
    For the latest see the site's web page. A listing of modules performed through 2016 as well as plans for 2017 2018 is available (including questionnaires for not-yet-released years). Ongoing program of crossnational collaboration. Develops topical modules dealing with important areas of social science as supplements to regular national surveys. Every survey includes questions about general attitudes toward various social issues such as the legal system, sex, and the economy. Special topics have included the environment, the role of government, social inequality, social support, family and gender issues, work orientation, the impact of religious background, behavior, and beliefs on social and political preferences, and national identity. Participating countries vary for each topical module. Registration is required. 1998-2007 is also available in an easy to use comparative program.

  • Iowa Youth and Families Project, 1989-1992 (IYFP)
    Contains the first 4 waves. Developed from an initial sample of 451 7th graders from 2-parent families in rural Iowa. Merged with the Iowa Single Parent Project (ISPP) to form the Iowa Family Transitions Project in 1994, when the target youth were seniors in high school. Survey data were collected from the target child (7th grader), a sibling within 4 years of age of the target child, and both parents. Field interviewers visited families at their homes on several occasions to administer questionnaires and videotape interaction tasks including family discussion tasks, family problem-solving tasks, sibling interaction tasks, and marital interaction tasks. The Household Data files contain information about the family's financial situation, involvement in farming, and demographic information about household members. The Parent and the Child Survey Data files contain responses to survey questions about the quality and stability of family relationships, emotional, physical, and behavioral problems of individual family members, parent-child conflict, family problem-solving skills, social and financial support from outside the home, traumatic life experiences, alcohol, drug, and tobacco use, and opinions on topics such as abortion, parenting, and gender roles. In addition, the Child Survey Data files include responses collected from the target child and his or her sibling in the study about experiences with puberty, dating, sexual activity, and risk-taking behavior. The Problem-Solving Data files contain survey data collected from respondents about the family interactions tasks. The Observational Data files contain the interviewers' observations collected during these tasks. Demographic variables include sex, age, employment status, occupation, income, home ownership, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, as well as the ages and sex of all household members and their relationship to the head of household. Demographic information collected on the parents also includes their birth order within their family, the ages and political philosophy of their parents, the sex, age, education level, and occupation of their siblings, and the country of origin of their ancestors.

  • Jewish Values Survey 2012
    Examined the values, issues and political preferences of Jewish Americans. Included questions that explored views about religion and Jewish culture and traditions. Featured items to gauge views about foreign policy, Iran and Israel. Also covered voting behavior, economic inequality, immigration and social issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage.

  • Lesbian Christian Identity
    Purpose was to explore and distinguish identity management strategies used by lesbian Christians. The strategies were informed by Erving Goffman's book, Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity. Based on his work, 6 different scales were created: normalization, passing, ambivalence, superiority, minstrelization, and group affiliation. Additionally, a measure of evangelical Christian identity was created using church affiliations, self-identification as an evangelical, and beliefs consonant with evangelicalism. Variables include: the source of dissonance between religious beliefs and sexuality as well as resolution strategies for the dissonance.

  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1971, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2005 [California]
    Began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their sixties), middle-aged parents (then in their early forties), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a 4th generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service.

  • Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures
    Contains 69 new indices for race, ethnicity, language, religion, income, and geography.

  • Millennial Values and Voter Engagement Survey, 2012
    Follow-up panel study to the Millennial Values Survey (April 2012) and included 1,214 younger Millennials (ages 18-25) who were part of the first study and were re-contacted. The survey, conducted in late August and early September, included questions on voter engagement, parental influence on voting behavior, and support for affirmative action policies. The original survey was conducted among a random sample of college-age Millennials (ages 18-24) and included questions about political priorities, political candidates and the 2012 election. The original survey also measured views about religious groups, and Christianity in particular, and covered other political topics ranging from economic inequality, the role of government and pluralism.

  • Monitoring the Future. 1976+
    Ongoing study of the behaviors, attitudes, and values of American secondary school students, college students, and young adults. Each year, a total of some 50,000 8th, 10th and 12th grade students are surveyed. A number of questions on drug use are asked.

    Sample Size: 8th grade - approx. 18,000; 10th grade - approx. 17,000; 12th grade - approx. 16,000.

  • Murray Research Archive - Diversity Archive (Race, Ethnicity, Sexual Orientation, Religion)
    Consists of numerous studies with racially and ethnically diverse samples. Also houses a number of studies focusing on specific ethnic groups and on ethnic relations.

    Application may need to be made directly to the Murray Research Archive for permission to use the data.

  • Muslims in the American public square: shifting political winds & fallout from 9/11, Afghanistan, and Iraq.
    Interviews of 1,846 Muslim Americans chosen at random nationwide. All calls were made from Zogby International headquarters in Utica, N.Y., from Thursday, August 5 to Wednesday, September 15, 2004.

  • National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012)
    Nationally representative study of congregations carried out via interviews with congregational informants, mostly clergy. Aso available through NADAC.

  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Waves I-IV, 1994-2008 (Add Health)
    Collected data for the purpose of providing information on the general health and well-being of adolescents in the United States, including, with respect to such adolescents, information on: (1) the behaviors that promote health and the behaviors that are detrimental to health; and (2) the influence on health of factors particular to the communities in which adolescents reside. Wave IV consists of data from the most recent of 4 in-home interviews which have followed a nationally representative sample of adolescents since they were in grades 7-12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Wave IV interviews were completed in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32. The study combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Documentation can also be found on the AddHealth site and the Codebook Explorer.

  • National Politics Study (NPS) (2004)
    Comparative data about individuals' political attitudes, beliefs, aspirations, and behaviors at the beginning of the 21st century. Explored the nature of political involvement and participation among individuals from different racial and ethnic groups. Included questions about voting preferences, party affiliation, organizational membership, immigration, racial consciousness, religion, acculturation, and views of government policies.

  • National Politics Study, 2008
    The 2008 election offers a rare opportunity to analyze a significant event in American history - the election of the first African American president. Because the longitudinal panel series began in 2004, prior to the emergence of President Obama as a serious political candidate and nominee, the results from these surveys provide a rare vehicle for comparing data over time on important demographic, political, and, of particular interest given President Obama's racial background, racial and ethnic issues related to vote choice and political behavior. Topics covered include: demographic information of the population, work status, home ownership, political ideology, party identification, presidential choice, race relations, feeling thermometer data for a variety of political figures and relevant groups or organizations, and current events such as the Iraq War and same-sex marriage. Because differences among the racial and ethnic groups surveyed in this study are of political significance (Whites, African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and Caribbean Blacks), much of the data presented here is disaggregated by racial and ethnic group.

  • National Study of Youth and Religion (2003, 2005, 2007-2008)
    Nationally representative telephone survey of 3,290 English & Spanish-speaking teenagers between the ages of 13-17, and their parents. Also includes 80 oversampled Jewish households, not nationally representative, bringing the total number of completed cases to 3,370. Purpose is to research the shape & influence of religion & spirituality in the lives of American youth; to identify effective practices in the religious, moral, and social formation of the lives of youth; to describe the extent & perceived effectiveness of the programs & opportunities that religious communities are offering to their youth; and to foster an informed national discussion about the influence of religion in youth's lives, in order to encourage sustained reflection about and rethinking of our cultural and institutional practices with regard to youth & religion. The 2nd wave was designed to be a re-interview of all Wave 1 youth survey respondents. Parents of the youth respondents were not re-interviewed. At the time of the 2nd survey, respondents were between the ages of 16-21. Conducted from June 9-November 24, 2005. 2nd wave interviews were conducted only in English. Four youth respondents did not participate in the Wave 2 interview due to not being able to understand or speak English. Wave 2 covers many of the same topics as Wave 1. Many of the questions are identical. However, Wave 2 was re-designed to take into account changes in the lives of the respondents as they began to enter young adulthood. Wave 2 included new questions pertaining to behaviors occurring during the transition to adulthood, such as non-marital cohabitation, educational and career aspirations, pregnancy and marriage. In Wave 3 every attempt was made to re-interview all English-speaking Wave 1 youth survey respondents. At the time of the 3rd survey, respondents were between the ages of 18-24. Conducted from September 24, 2007-April 21, 2008. Wave 3 replicated many of the questions asked in Waves 1 & 2 with some changes made to better capture the respondents' lives as they grew older. For example, there were fewer questions on parental monitoring and more on post-high school educational aspirations.

  • National Survey of Black Americans 1979-1980, 1987-1988, 1988-1989, 1992
    Developed with input from social scientists, students, and a national advisory panel of Black scholars, the survey investigates neighborhood-community integration, services, crime and community contact, the role of religion and the church, physical and mental health, self-esteem, life satisfaction, employment, the effects of chronic unemployment, the effects of race on the job, interaction with family and friends, racial attitudes, race identity, group stereotypes, and race ideology. Demographic variables include education, marital status, income, employment status, occupation, and political behavior and affiliation.

  • National Survey of High School Biology Teachers
    Based on a nationally representative probability sample of U.S. public high school biology teachers. A total of 926 teachers completed questionnaires between March 1 and May 5 of 2007. Teachers responded to 86 questions pertaining to their educational backgrounds, teaching practices, and personal attitudes. Focused on respondents' approach to teaching evolution and creationism in the classroom. Teachers' personal views and understanding of evolution were examined, as well as potential outside influences on their teaching, such as parents, school board members, and religious leaders.

  • North American Jewish Data Bank
    Repository for demographic and other quantitative social scientific surveys about Jews in the United States and Canada. Archives the National Jewish Population Surveys as well as a number of community surveys.

  • Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) Series. 1968+
    Designed to fill the need for a better understanding of the determinants of family income and its changes. Longitudinal survey of US individuals and the families in which they reside. Can be used for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intergenerational analysis and for studying both individuals and families. For comparisons of Current Population Survey, Survey of Income and Program Participation, and PSID, see the comparison chart. For comparisons of National Longitudinal Surveys, Survey of Income and Program Participation, and PSID, see the comparison chart. Includes section on education, food, health, housing, psychological state, and religion. Geography is down to the state level.
    Includes various supplemental surveys including:
    • Disability and Use of Time (DUST): collected information from older adults in PSID families about disability, time use, and well-being during telephone interviews conducted shortly after the 2009 and 2013 Main Interviews.
    • Child Development Supplement (CDS): In 1997 information on PSID children ages 0-12 was obtained through extensive interviews with the child, their primary caregiver, secondary caregiver, absent parent, teacher, and school administrator. Information was collected again in 2002/2003 and 2007/2008 for children in this cohort who remained under 18. Information includes a broad array of developmental outcomes including physical health, emotional well-being, intellectual and academic achievement, cognitive ability, social relationships with family and peers, time diaries, and much more. The CDS 2014 covers all sample children in PSID households born or adopted into the PSID since 1997. The study design and questionnaire content are consistent with earlier waves of CDS to permit cross - cohort analysis of children's development.
    • Housing, Mortgage Stress, and Wealth Data (2009, 2011, 2013, 2015) as well as Wealth files for 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007.
    • Transition into Adulthood: When children in the CDS cohort are older than 18 and have left high school, information is obtained about their circumstances. This study has been implemented in 2005, and biennially thereafter. Information includes measures of time use, psychological functioning, marriage, family, responsibilities, employment and income, education and career goals, health, social environment, religiosity, and outlook on life.
    • Childhood Retrospective Circumstances Study (PSID - CRCS). First study conducted by the PSID using the internet as the primary mode of data collection. Goal was to design and collect a mixed mode (web or paper) module from household heads and, if married/cohabitating, spouses/partners, about their childhood experiences. The data may be used to study early life influences on adult health and economic outcomes. Has questions on parental relationships, health, socioeconomic status, neighborhood quality, friendships, school experiences, exposure to the criminal justice system, parent/guardian mental health, and young adut mentoring. The initial PSID-CRCS sample consisted of 13,117 individuals aged 19 and older (aged 19 by January 1, 2013) who were household heads and spouses/partners in PSID families that participated in the 2013 wave of PSID. Individuals for which other family unit members or proxies served as respondents in the 2013 core PSID interview and those who completed their core interview in Spanish were not eligible (N=593). During editing eligibility status was reviewed and confirmed for 12,985 cases. Many portions of CRCS are restricted.

  • Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life
    Surveys on religion as it relates to public life.

  • Portraits of American Life Study (PALS) (2006, 2012)
    Seeks to understand the impact of religion in everyday life, and ultimately the connections between religious change and other forms of change among diverse individuals and families over the course of their lives. Free registration is required.

  • PRRI/RNS Religion News Survey (2010-2013)
    Conducted by Public Religion Research Institute, in partnership with Religion News Service, to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics.

  • Race, Class, and Culture Survey 2012
    Nationally-representative survey of 2,501 Americans with a focus on the role of race and class and its intersection with religion and politics, including extensive analysis of white working-class Americans. One important contribution of this project is the development of a parsimonious and replicable definition of white working class Americans. Highlights the significant divides among white working-class Americans along the lines of region, religion, gender, and age. Questions were asked about voting behavior, candidate favorability, the economy and inequality, view of government, perspectives on America, discrimination and diversity, and social issues (including same-sex marriage, abortion, and the environment).

  • Religion and Deviance at Four American Universities
    Contains measures on religious belief and practice, Christian fundamentalist beliefs, religious context, and deviant behavior from students at 4 American universities. Two of these universities are public state schools; two are private and have religious affiliations. A total of 1,753 respondents were surveyed regarding their religious beliefs and practices, tattoos, piercings, and engagement in (or abstinence from) sexual intercourse, binge drinking, and marijuana use.

  • Religion and State Constitutions, 1990-2002
    Set of measures that systematically gauge the intersection between government and religion. Examines constitutional clauses that address religion for 169 states on a yearly basis between 1990 and 2002. This constitutes all countries with populations of 250,000 or more, as well as a sampling of smaller states.

  • Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey
    Addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. Gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn. Consists of a national sample as well as samples for Arkansas and Ohio.

  • Religious congregations & membership in the United States 2000 : an enumeration by region, state and county based on data reported for 149 religious bodies.
    2010 data is available through ARDA.

    Citation:
    Religious congregations & membership in the United States 2000 : an enumeration by region, state and county based on data reported for 149 religious bodies. (Electronic File)
    Producer: Glenmary Research Center

  • Religious Freedom in the Courts, 1981-1997
    Derived from a content analysis of the The Religious Freedom Reporter (the Reporter), which is a journal published monthly by the Church-State Resource Center of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, Campbell University. The journal dates back to January 1981 and, as stated in the introductory preface to each issue, "seeks to provide comprehensive coverage of pending and decided cases, new legislation and regulations, law review articles and other resources related to religious freedom." Includes information from all levels of the judiciary. Has information on type of case (e.g., free exercise, first amendment and establishment), when the case was decided, level of court and the religion of the group or person who brought the case forward.

  • Religious Human Rights NGOs
    Examines religious non-governmental organizations that focus on human rights. Contains information about each organization's founding, organizational structure, online presence, geographical focuses, human rights emphases, religious identity, and U.N. consultative status.

  • Social Capital Benchmark Survey, 2000
    Comprises both a national sample of some 3,000 respondents and community respondents in 41 communities nationwide (across 29 states) covering an additional 26,700 respondents. Measures everything from levels of giving blood, to hanging out with friends, to participating in various groups and associations, to levels of trust, to participation in group arts and group sports, to the diversity of our friendship patterns.

  • Social Capital Community Survey, 2006
    Consisted of a national sample and targeted samples in 22 American communities. Follow-up to the Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey (2000).

  • Social Explorer (1790+)
    Allows user to visually analyze and understand the demography of the United States through the use of interactive maps and data reports. Covers the censuses from 1790+ along with the American Community Surveys and some religion data. Also includes the 2011 censuses for Canada and the United Kingdom.

  • Spirit and Power: A 10-Country Survey of Pentecostals
    Investigates the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. Includes surveys in 10 countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, India, the Philippines, and South Korea. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis.

  • Spiritual Well-Being in the United States and Sweden, 1979
    During the 1970's, the increasing societal and scholarly recognition of the central importance of spirituality to personal and social well-being was coupled with a growing need in the social and behavioral sciences to develop tools to conceptualize and operationally measure spiritual well-being. This study was based on the assumptions that religion and spirituality overlap but are not synonyms. The primary focus of attention was upon relationships among variables in diverse populations from two national cultures.

  • State of the First Amendment [1997 - 2006]
    Collects data on Americans' attitudes towards First Amendment issues, including freedom of expression and tolerance for art that may be offensive to others.

  • United States National Church Shooting Database, 1980-2005
    Uses online newspaper archive articles to document all cases of shootings on church property within the United States from 1980-2005.

  • University of Rochester/Zogby International global religion survey
    Zogby International conducted interviews of 600 people each in India (Hindu, Muslim), Peru (Roman Catholic), Russia (Russian Orthodox), Saudi Arabia (Muslim), and South Korea (Buddhist, Christian); 593 in Israel (Jewish, Muslim, Druze); and 795 in the United States (Catholic, Protestant).

  • Voice of the People Series (2005+)
    Annual survey to solicit public opinion on social and political issues. Every year the survey will be conducted in approximately 50 countries, with a minimal sample size of 500 per country. Wherever possible, within each country a nationally representative sample n=500 adults, male and female, aged 18 and older will be used. In some emergent countries, where such research conditions are not possible, there may be stated variations to this (e.g. urban areas only). Similarly, in the developed world interviews will be conducted by telephone, while in emergent and under-developed countries face to face interviews will be conducted. Demographic variables include sex, age, household income, education level, employment status, and religious preference.

  • World Religion Database
    Contains detailed statistics on religious affiliation for every country of the world.

  • World Religion Dataset: Global Religion Dataset
    Aims to provide detailed information about religious adherence worldwide since 1945. It contains data about the number of adherents by religion in each of the states in the international system. These numbers are given for every half-decade period (1945, 1950, etc., through 2010). Percentages of the states' populations that practice a given religion are also provided. (Note: These percentages are expressed as decimals, ranging from 0 to 1, where 0 indicates that 0 percent of the population practices a given religion and 1 indicates that 100 percent of the population practices that religion.) Some of the religions (as detailed below) are divided into religious families. To the extent data are available, the breakdown of adherents within a given religion into religious families is also provided. The Global Religion Dataset: This dataset uses a religion-by-five-year unit. It aggregates the number of adherents of a given religion and religious group globally by five-year periods.

  • World Religion Dataset: National Religion Dataset
    Aims to provide detailed information about religious adherence worldwide since 1945. It contains data about the number of adherents by religion in each of the states in the international system. These numbers are given for every half-decade period (1945, 1950, etc., through 2010). Percentages of the states' populations that practice a given religion are also provided. (Note: These percentages are expressed as decimals, ranging from 0 to 1, where 0 indicates that 0 percent of the population practices a given religion and 1 indicates that 100 percent of the population practices that religion.) Some of the religions are divided into religious families. To the extent data are available, the breakdown of adherents within a given religion into religious families is also provided. The National Religion Dataset: The observation in this dataset is a state-five-year unit. This dataset provides information regarding the number of adherents by religions, as well as the percentage of the state's population practicing a given religion.

  • World Religion Dataset: Regional Religion Dataset
    Aims to provide detailed information about religious adherence worldwide since 1945. It contains data about the number of adherents by religion in each of the states in the international system. These numbers are given for every half-decade period (1945, 1950, etc., through 2010). Percentages of the states' populations that practice a given religion are also provided. (Note: These percentages are expressed as decimals, ranging from 0 to 1, where 0 indicates that 0 percent of the population practices a given religion and 1 indicates that 100 percent of the population practices that religion.) Some of the religions (as detailed below) are divided into religious families. To the extent data are available, the breakdown of adherents within a given religion into religious families is also provided. The Regional Religion Dataset: The unit of analysis is the region, measured at five-year intervals. The Correlates of War regional breakdown is used with one modification: the Oceania category is added for Correlates of War nation numbers 900 and above.

  • World Values Survey (WVS)
    Designed to enable a crossnational comparison of values and norms on a wide variety of topics and to monitor changes in values and attitudes across the globe. A variety of questions on religion and morality were included. Coverage includes: Albania - 1998, 2002; Algeria - 2002, 2014; Andorra - 2005; Argentina - 1991, 1995, 1999, 2006, 2013; Armenia - 1997, 2011; Australia - 1995, 2005, 2012; Austria - 1990, 1999; Azerbaijan - 1997, 2011-2012; Bahrain (2014); Bangladesh - 1996, 2002; Belarus - 1996, 2000, 2011; Belgium - 1981, 1990, 1999; Bosnia and Herzegovinia - 1998, 2001; Brazil - 1990, 1997, 2006, 2014; Bulgaria - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2006; Burkina Faso - 2007; Canada - 1982, 1990, 2000, 2006; Chile - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2006; China - 1990, 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Colombia - 1998, 2005, 2012; Croatia - 1996, 1999; Cyprus - 2006, 2011; Czech Republic - 1991, 1998, 1999; Denmark - 1981, 1990, 1999; Dominican Republic - 1998; Ecuador - 2013; Egypt - 2000, 2008, 2012; El Salvador - 1999; Estonia - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2011; Ethiopia - 2007; Finland - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005; France - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006; Georgia - 1996, 2008, 2014; Germany - 2006, 2013; Germany East - 1990, 1997; Germany West - 1981, 1990, 1997; Ghana - 2007, 2011; Great Britain - 1981, 1990, 1998, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Greece - 1999; Hong Kong - 2005, 2013; Hungary - 1991, 1998, 1999; Iceland - 1984, 1990, 1999; India - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2014; Indonesia - 2001, 2006; Iran - 2003, 2005; Iraq - 2006, 2013; Ireland - 1981, 1990, 1999; Israel - 2001; Italy - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2005; Japan - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010; Jordan - 2007, 2014; Kazakhstan - 2011; Kuwait - 2013; Kyrgyzstan - 2003, 2011; Lativa - 1990, 1996, 1999; Lebanon - 2013; Libya - 2013; Lithuania - 1990, 1997, 1999; Luxembourg - 1999; Macedonia - 1998, 2001; Malaysia - 2006, 2011; Mali - 2007; Malta - 1983, 1991, 1999; Mexico - 1995, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2012; Moldova - 1996, 2006; Montenegro - 1996, 2001; Morocco - 2001, 2007, 2011; Netherlands - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006, 2012; New Zealand - 1998, 2004, 2011; Nigeria - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2011; Northern Ireland - 1981, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Norway - 1990, 1996, 2007; Pakistan - 1997, 2001, 2012; Palestine - 2013; Peru - 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Philippines - 1996, 2001, 2012; Poland - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2012; Portugal - 1990, 1999; Puerto Rico - 1995, 2001; Qatar- 2010; Romania - 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2012; Russia - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Rwanda - 2007, 2012; Saudi Arabia - 2003; Serbia - 1996, 2001, 2006; Singapore - 2002, 2012; Slovakia - 1991, 1998, 1999; Slovenia - 1992, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2011; South Africa - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2013; South Korea - 1980, 1990, 1996, 2001, 2005, 2010; Spain - 1981, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2007, 2011; Sweden - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Switzerland - 1989, 1996, 2007; Taiwan - 1995, 2006, 2012; Tanzania - 2001; Thailand - 2007, 2013; Trinidad and Tobago - 2006, 2010; Turkey - 1990, 1997, 2001, 2007, 2011; Uganda - 2001; Ukraine - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; United Kingdom - 2006 (also see Great Britain and Northern Ireland); United States - 1982, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, 2011; Uruguay - 1996, 2006, 2011; Uzbekistan - 2011; Venezuela - 1996, 2000; Vietnam - 2001, 2006; Yemen - 2013; Zambia - 2007; and Zimbabwe - 2001, 2011.

This page last updated: October 21, 2009