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Finding Data: Data on Labor - Canada

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • 'Brain Drain' Debate in the United Kingdom, c.1950-1970
    Qualitative project. Sought to provide an analysis of the 'brain drain' debate of the 1950s and 1960s as a social phenomenon. The term 'brain drain' was adopted in the 1960s in the context of concerns the United Kingdom was losing skilled scientific and engineering personnel to other countries. Although the term is used in a variety of academic, policy and popular discussions about the international mobility of scientists, this project sought to rectify the absence of scholarly literature analyzing the original 'brain drain' debate. Comprised of 19 oral history interviews with scientists and engineers who emigrated to the United States or Canada in the 1950s or 1960s as well as British policymakers involved in any way in the 'brain drain' debate at this time. Also included is the transcript of a 'witness seminar' that brought officials and former emigres together to discuss their recollections. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • Aboriginal People's Survey (1991, 2001, 2006, 2012)
    Data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. Identifies the needs of Aboriginal people and focus on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility.

  • Canadian Income Survey (CIS) (2012-2014)
    Cross-sectional survey developed to provide a portrait of the income and income sources of Canadians, with their individual and household characteristics.

  • Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Survey (COEP) (1995)
    Interviewed people who had a job interruption during one of the 2 reference periods: (1) Jan. 29-Mar. 11, 1995; or (2) Apr. 23-June 3, 1995. Gathered information on subsequent employment during a 13-month period, background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, income, assets and debts, expenditures, and training. In 1996, the COEP survey was re-designed as the Changes in Employment Survey. The re-designed survey had changes in the sample design and content to allow a more complete picture of the population of individuals experiencing a loss or change of employment. The main change to the content compared to COEP 1995 is as follows: information is collected about all employers the individual worked for during the reference period whereas under the 1995 design, information was only collected for the ROE employer, the next employer and the current employer.

  • Changes in Employment Survey (Cohorts 1 to 10) (1995-1997) (CIES)
    The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of Bill C-12 on the Employment Insurance legislation and the degree to which program objectives have been achieved. Bill C-12 was introduced into legislation in part in July 1996, with the remainder coming into effect in January 1997. The legislation was designed to better reward work effort, to ensure adequate benefits by targeting those most in need, to encourage job creation, and to improve the perception of fairness. Specific aspects of these objectives were addressed in the survey. In addition, the survey attempts to get a measure of the aggregate impact of the legislation. Secondary objectives of the survey include the continuation of the information collected in the Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Surveys. This includes collection of background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, assets and debts, expenditures, and utilization of Employment Insurance and Social Assistance.

  • Class Structure and Class Consciousness: Merged Multi-Nation File (1980-1983)
    Measures how such social concepts as authority, autonomy, and hierarchy relate to the social, economic, and occupational positions of individuals, thus providing a systematic means for analyzing social class structure. Addressed work-related issues such as supervision, decision-making, autonomy, respondent's formal position in the hierarchy, ownership, credentials, and income. Other work- related data describe the size, industrial sector, and government or corporate linkages of the individual's employer. Further information was gathered on the class origins of the respondent's family and of the families of the respondent's spouse and friends. Data on class-related experiences such as unemployment and union participation were also collected, as well as data on the division of power and labor in the household. In addition, contained a broad range of questions on social and political attitudes and on the respondent's political participation. Universe: USA: 18 & older working, not working but wanting to work, or housewives with working spouses. Sweden: 18-65 in the work force. Norway: 16-66 employed, unemployed, or housewives. Canada: Non-institutionalized & non-disabled 15-65 employed, unemployed or housewives. Finland: 18-65 employed, unemployed or housewives.

  • Concordances between the 1980 and 1991 editions of the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)

  • Concordances between the 1980 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and the National Occupational Classification (NOC)

  • Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF), 1970-2013
    Contains equivalently defined variables for the British Household Panel Study (BHPS), the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA), the Korea Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS) (new this year), the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) (new this year), the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), and the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Each user must apply for access.

  • Cross-national Nonstandard Work Data
    Country-level dataset with indicators of part-time work and other forms of nonstandard employment based on a sample of 50 countries between 2000 and 2010. The original sources for this dataset include the OECD, Eurostat, International Social Survey Programee, and ESS.

  • Employment Insurance Coverage Survey (2000-2015)
    Provides a meaningful picture of who does or does not have access to employment insurance benefits among the jobless and those in a situation of underemployment in Canada. Also covers access to maternity and parental benefits.

  • General Social Survey (Canada)
    Surveys from a sample selected across the 10 provinces. The 2 primary objectives are a) to gather data on social trends in order to monitor changes in the living conditions and wellbeing of Canadians over time; and b) to provide immediate information on specific social policy issues of current or emerging interest. Each survey contains a core topic, focus or exploratory questions and a standard set of socio-demographic questions used for classification. More recent cycles have also included some qualitative questions which explore perceptions. For all cycles except Cycle 16, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycle 16 only sampled persons aged 45 and older. Until 1998, the sample size was approximately 10,000 persons. This was increased in 1999 to 25,000.
    Cycle 1, Health and social support, 1985.
    Cycle 2, Time use, social mobility and language use, 1986
    Cycle 3, Personal risk, 1988
    Cycle 4, Education, work and retirement, 1989
    Cycle 5, Family and friends, 1990
    Cycle 6, Health, 1991
    Cycle 7, Time use, 1992
    Cycle 8, Personal risk, 1993
    Cycle 9, Education, work and retirement, 1994
    Cycle 10. Family, 1995
    Cycle 11, Social and community support, 1996
    Cycle 12, Time use, 1998
    Cycle 13, Victimization, 1999
    Cycle 14, Access to and use of information communication, 2000
    Cycle 15, Family history, 2001
    Cycle 16, Aging and social support, 2002
    Cycle 17, Social engagement, 2003
    Cycle 18, Victimization, 2004.
    Cycle 19, Time use, 2005.
    Cycle 20, Family Transitions, 2006.
    Cycle 21, Family, Social Support and Retirement, 2007.
    Cycle 22, Social Networks, 2008.
    Cycle 23, Victimization, 2009.
    Cycle 24, Time-Stress and Well-Being, 2010.
    Cycle 25, Families, 2011.
    Cycle 26, Social Support and Aging, 2012
    Cycle 27, Giving, Volunteering, Participating, 2013
    Cycle 28, Victimization, 2014
    Cycle 29, Time Use, 2015

  • ICTWSS: Database on Institutional Characteristics of Trade Unions, Wage Setting, State Intervention and Social Pacts in 34 countries between 1960 and 2012
    Covers 4 key elements of modern political economies in advanced capitalist societies: trade unionism, wage setting, state intervention and social pacts. Contains annual data for Australia; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Canada; Cyprus; the Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Germany; Greece; Finland; France; Hungary; Ireland; Italy; Japan; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; the Netherlands; New Zealand; Malta; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Spain; Slovenia; Slovakia; Sweden; Switzerland; the United Kingdom; the United States.

  • International Social Survey Program (ISSP) (1985+)
    For the latest see the site's web page. A listing of modules performed as well as plans through 2020 is available (including questionnaires for not-yet-released years). Ongoing program of crossnational collaboration. Develops topical modules dealing with important areas of social science as supplements to regular national surveys. Every survey includes questions about general attitudes toward various social issues such as the legal system, sex, and the economy. Special topics have included the environment, the role of government, social inequality, social support, family and gender issues, work orientation, the impact of religious background, behavior, and beliefs on social and political preferences, and national identity. Participating countries vary for each topical module. Registration is required. 1998-2007 is also available in an easy to use comparative program.

  • IPUMS-International Census Data
    Project dedicated to collecting and distributing census data from around the world. Samples are currently available for Argentina (1970, 1980, 1991, 2001, 2010), Armenia (2001, 2011), Austria (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Bangladesh (1991, 2001, 2011), Belarus (1999, 2009), Bolivia (1976, 1992, 2001), Botswana (1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Brazil (1960, 1970, 1980, 1991, 2000, 2010), Burkina Faso (1985, 1996, 2006), Cambodia (1998, 2008), Cameroon (1976, 1987, 2005), Canada (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Chile (1960, 1970, 1982, 1992, 2002), China (1982, 1990, 2000), Colombia (1964, 1973, 1985, 1993, 2005), Costa Rica (1963, 1973, 1984, 2000, 2011), Cuba (2002), Dominican Republic (1960, 1970, 1981, 2002, 2010), Ecuador (1962, 1974, 1982, 1990, 2001, 2010), Egypt (1986, 1996, 2006), El Salvador (1992, 2007), Ethiopia [1984, 1994, 2007], Fiji (1966, 1976, 1986, 1996, 2007), France (1962, 1968, 1975, 1982, 1990, 1999, 2006, 2011), West Germany (1970, 1987), East Germany (1971, 1981) Ghana (1984, 2000, 2010), Greece (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Guinea (1983, 1996), Haiti (1971, 1982, 2003), Hungary (1970, 1980, 1990, 2001, 2011, India (1983, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009 -- all employment surveys), Indonesia (1971, 1976, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000, 2005, 2010), Iran (2006, 2011), Iraq (1997), Ireland (1971, 1979, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2002, 2006, 2011), Israel (1972, 1983, 1995), Italy (2001), Jamaica (1982, 1991, 2001), Jordan (2004), Kenya (1969, 1979, 1989, 1999, 2009), Kyrgyz Republic (1999, 2009), Liberia (1974, 2008), Malawi (1987, 1998, 2008), Malaysia (1970, 1980, 1991, 2000), Mali (1987, 1998, 2009), Mexico (1960, 1970, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015), (Mongolia 1989, 2000), Morocco (1982, 1994, 2004), Mozambique [1997, 2007], Nepal (2001), Netherlands (1960, 1971, 2001), Nicaragua (1971, 1995, 2005), Nigeria (2006-2010), Pakistan (1973, 1981, 1998), Palestine (1997, 2007), Panama (1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010), Paraguay [1962, 1972, 1982, 1992, 2002], Peru (1993, 2007), Philippines (1990, 1995, 2000), Poland (1978, 1988, 2002, 2011), Portugal (1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Puerto Rico (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2005, 2010), Romania (1977, 1992, 2002, 2011), Rwanda (1991, 2002), Saint Lucia (1980, 1991), Senegal (1988, 2002), Sierra Leone (2004), Slovenia (2002), South Africa (1996, 2001, 2007, 2011), Spain (1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), South Sudan (2008), Sudan (2008), Switzerland (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000), Tanzania (1988, 2002, 2012), Thailand (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000), Trinidad and Tobago (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2011), Turkey (1985, 1990, 2000), Uganda (1991, 2001), Ukraine (2001), United Kingdom (1991, 2001), United States (1850+), Uruguay (1963, 1975, 1985, 1996, 2006, 2011), Venezuela (1971, 1981, 1990, 2001), Vietnam (1989, 1999, 2009), Zambia (1990, 2000, 2010). Registration is required.

  • Key Indicators of the Labour Market (9th edition) (KILM)
    9th edition exists in multiple formats and requires installation.

  • Labour Force Survey (1976+) (Canada)
    Provides monthly estimates of employment and unemployment for Canada.

  • Luxembourg Income Studies (LIS)
    Household income surveys involving 43 countries. Also available are the Luxembourg Employment Study, a database containing data on labor force characteristics for 16 countries (ceased in 2000 and incorporated into LIS), and the Luxembourg Wealth Study, a database containing data on household wealth in 12 countries. Users must register to gain access, but registration is free for academic use. For variables in the LIS and LWS over time see their web sites.

  • Manpower Employment Outlook Survey (1st Quarter 2007+)
    Indicator of hiring activity for the next quarter. The forecast includes responses from over 65,000 employers in 42 countries and covers the world's major labor markets.

  • Mexican Migration Project. (MMP) 1982+
    Main focus is to gather social as well as economic information on Mexican-US migration. Has 154 communities in 24 states. Each year, during the winter months (when seasonal migrants tend to return home), households in communities located throughout Mexico are randomly sampled. After gathering social, demographic, and economic information on the household and its members, interviewers collect basic immigration information on each person's first and last trip to the United States. From household heads and spouses, detailed year-by-year labor history and migration information is compiled; in addition, for household head migrants, a detailed series of questions about their last trip to the U.S. is administered, focusing on employment, earnings, and use of U.S. social services. Information on 24,701 Mexican households, 957 U.S. households, and individual-level data on 162,293 persons. Contains information on 8,252 household heads with migration experience to the U.S. and information on 51 household heads with Canadian migration experience.

  • Migration and Remittances Factbook

  • National Graduates Survey and Follow up Graduates Surveys (1982, 1986, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2013 (Class of 2009-2010))
    Canadian study designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. Princeton has access to all non-restricted public use microdata files from Statistics Canada.

  • National Household Survey (2011)
    The Canadian census questions cover basic demographic characteristics such as age, sex, marital and common-law status, household relationships and mother tongue. Information previously collected by the mandatory long-form census questionnaire will be collected as part of the new voluntary National Household Survey (NHS).

  • Occupational Wages around the World (OWW) Database
    Contains occupational wage data for 161 occupations in 171 countries from 1983 to 2008.

  • Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) (2001, 2006)
    Post-censal survey of adults in Canada with disabilities, including any person whose everyday activities are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. Covers themes such as activity limitations, help with everyday activities, education, employment status, social participation and economic characteristics.

  • Statistics of Trade Union Membership (1980-2009)
    Includes data for 49 countries. Dates vary by country but range from 1980-2009. For post 2009, use ILOSTAT. Once in click on "Browse by subject" then "Yearly indicators" then Industrial Relations.

    Citation:
    Statistics of Trade Union Membership (1980-2009) (Electronic File)
    Producer: International Labor Office

  • Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC)
    Assesses the proficiency of adults from age 16 onwards in literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology rich environments. The data collection took place from August 1, 2011 to March, 31 2012 in most participating countries. Around 166 000 adults, representing 724 million adults aged 16 to 65, were surveyed in 24 countries and sub-national regions in the official language/s of the countries.

  • Survey of Financial Security (1983, 1999, 2005, 2012)
    Collection of income, expenses, assets, debts and wealth data on the economy of Canadian families. Produced at the economic family level with information on family demographics; income; expenses; behaviors and attitudes; principal residence; assets, debts and net worth; family composition and size; and the major income recipient.

  • Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics Public Use Microdata 1993-1994, 1996-2011
    Collection of income, labour and family variables on persons in Canada and their families. 2011 is the final survey and will be replaced by the Canadian Income Survey (CIS).

  • Survey of Older Workers (2008)
    As a Labour Force Survey supplement, its objective is to understand the components that are integral in the decision to either continue working or retire as perceived by older workers in the 10 provinces of Canada.

    Sample Size: More than 10,000 respondents aged 50 to 75 residing in private households in the provinces.

  • Union Centralization among Advanced Industrial Societies: An Empirical Study
    Data Repository for the Golden-Wallerstein-Lange Project on Unions, Employers, Collective Bargaining and Industrial Relations for 16 OECD Countries, 1950-2000.

  • Workplace Ethnography (WE) Project, 1944-2002
    Provided deep descriptions on a wide range of topics, such as worker behavior, management behavior, coworker relations, labor process, conflict and resistance, citizenship behavior, emotional labor, and sexual harassment. Coding of these characteristics yielded variables based on descriptions of worklife in specific organizational settings. The study data was collected in mainly two periods: the early 1990s and the early 2000s. The study generated 204 ethnographic cases. These cases were derived from 156 separate books since the observations reported in some books allowed the coding of multiple cases. The general scope of questions included organizational factors such as occupation, workplace organization, pay scheme, employment size, the situation of the company, the nature of company ownership, staff turnover, layoff frequency, how well the organization operated in terms of communications, recruitment and retention of personnel, and maintenance of equipment, as well as substantive facts concerning labor market opportunity, and labor force composition. On the topic of management, questions addressed leadership, organization of production, sexual harassment, and control strategies. Community factors were assessed through questions regarding unemployment and if the area was rural or urban. A series of questions addressed job satisfaction, pay, benefit package, job security, effort bargain, conflict with management/supervisors, training, worker strategies, conditions of consent/compliance, and nature of consent/compliance. The nature of work was queried through questions regarding autonomy, creativity, meaningful work, freedom of movement, comfort of work, injuries, employment status, and frequency of conflict with customers. Additional questions included size and nature of the focal group, group dynamics, conflict between the focal group and management, basis of alternative social groups at work, and if work friendships carried over to the outside. Questions about methodology covered ethnographer's theoretical orientation, focus of ethnography, ethnographer's gender, data collection method, supplemental data used, main type of supplemental data used, and position of key informant. Additional items gathered basic information about book title, author's last name, modal occupation, industry, country/region, and observer's role.

This page last updated: October 21, 2009