Princeton University Library Data and Statistical 
Services

Search DSS





Finding Data Analyzing Data Citing data

About Us


DSS lab consultation schedule
(Monday-Friday)
Sep 1-Nov 3By appt. here
Nov 6-Dec 15Walk-in, 2-5 pm*
Dec 18-Feb 2By appt. here
Feb 5-May 4Walk-in, 1-5 pm*
May 7-May 15Walk-in, 2-5 pm*
May 16-Aug 31By appt. here
For quick questions email data@princeton.edu.
*No appts. necessary during walk-in hrs.
Note: the DSS lab is open as long as Firestone is open, no appointments necessary to use the lab computers for your own analysis.

Follow DssData on Twitter
See DSS on Facebook

Finding Data: Data on Public Opinion - Latin America & the Carribean

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • America's Barometer (2004+)
    Public opinion data for Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad, United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Once in the database click on "Enter site via IP authentication" then online data analysis. Click on either Beginner or Expert and then choose your database.

  • Attitudes of Cubans, 1960
    Explored the personal situation of the respondents and their life satisfaction, as well as their expectations and worries about the future. In addition, the positive and negative aspects of life in Cuba were probed through questions focusing on the economic and political situation, social, religious, and work-related issues, and international affairs. Respondents were also asked to voice their hopes and fears for Cuba's future. Demographic data include age, sex, marital status, and occupation.

  • Banco de Informacion para la Investigacion Aplicada en Ciencias Sociales (BIIACS)
    Public opinion data on a variety of social, political and economic issues in Mexico. Free registration is required.

  • Chilean CERC Study
    Conducted by Carlos Huneeus, and corresponding to the years 1987 to 2005. Includes 56 barometer studies including questions about the political and economical Chilean actuality.

  • Citizen Disenchantment in Mexico (national survey, June 2006)
    Gauges citizen definitions of democracy (including a 12-item battery on electoral, liberal, and substantive conceptualizations of democracy) and evaluations of Mexican democracy. It also includes a 15-item battery on migration experiences. The survey is organized into 8 sections: (1) Political Participation and Preferences; (2) Political Interest; (3) Migration and Remittances; (4) General Concepts about Democracy; (5) Evaluation of Democracy in Mexico; (6) Support for Democracy; (7) Political Knowledge; and (8) Sociodemographic Data.

  • ESRU Social Mobility Survey in Mexico, 2006
    First nationally representative, fully probabilistic survey of inter-generational social mobility in Mexico. The main objective of the ESRU SMSM is to describe and analyze inter-generational socioeconomic mobility in Mexican society. The SMSM is a stratified multistage sample of 7,288 men and women aged 25-64 and living in private residences in Mexico. Collects information on the socioeconomic standing of the respondent and his/her spouse or partner, including education, occupation, income, assets, and wealth. Also includes information on the socioeconomic standing of the respondent's and his/her spouse/partner's parents and conditions when they were growing up. Additional topics include: international and domestic migration, health, occupational trajectory, opinions, and attitudes.

  • Gallup Analytics
    Analyze, visualize, and export data from Gallup's U.S. Daily tracking and World Poll surveys. U.S. tracks economic, wellbeing, and political data collected daily since 2008. It can be analyzed daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annually as well as by state and Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). World Poll data covers more than 80 metrics from 160+ countries collected since 2005. Does not include access to microdata.

  • Global Barometer
    Represents the largest, most careful and systematic comparative survey of attitudes and values toward politics, power, reform, democracy and citizens' political actions in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Arabic region. Based on a common module of questions contained in regional barometer surveys; for additional regional-specific questions, see the original surveys at www.afrobarometer.org, www.arabbarometer.org, www.asianbarometer.org and www.latinobarometro.org. Cross-national comparative surveys have been implemented in 55 political systems -namely Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Palestine, Algeria, Morocco, Kuwait and Lebanon. In each of the 55 countries or regions, a national research team administers a country-wide face-to-face survey using standardized survey instruments to compile the required micro-level data under a common research framework and research methodology.

  • Global Snap Poll on Tsunami in Japan and Impact on Views About Nuclear Energy, 2011
    Carried out by WIN-Gallup International from March 21 to April 10, 2011, in 47 countries across the globe. Aimed to measure public views about the tragic earthquake in Japan and its impact on opinions about nuclear energy. Respondents were asked whether they were in favor of or opposed to the use of nuclear energy as one of the ways to provide electricity to the world, whether they have heard or read about the earthquake and tsunami that hit parts of Japan, and whether they have heard or read about the leakage of radiation from nuclear reactors in Japan as a result of the earthquake. Respondents were also queried on what their views were about nuclear energy before the earthquake in Japan, what their major source of information about the tsunami and earthquake in Japan was, their view on how Japan's economy would recover, whether they were concerned about the possibility of a nuclear incident in their own country, and whether they thought that nuclear power plants in their country were properly secured against accidents. Demographic variables include sex, age, marital status, race, income, education level, employment status, religious preference, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

  • Global Views 2004: Mexican Public Opinion and Foreign Policy
    First ever comprehensive study of Mexican public and leadership opinion on international affairs. Designed to measure general attitudes and values concerning Mexico's relationship with the world rather than opinions on specific foreign policies or issues.

  • International Social Survey Program (ISSP) (1985+)
    For the latest see the site's web page. A listing of modules performed as well as plans through 2020 is available (including questionnaires for not-yet-released years). Ongoing program of crossnational collaboration. Develops topical modules dealing with important areas of social science as supplements to regular national surveys. Every survey includes questions about general attitudes toward various social issues such as the legal system, sex, and the economy. Special topics have included the environment, the role of government, social inequality, social support, family and gender issues, work orientation, the impact of religious background, behavior, and beliefs on social and political preferences, and national identity. Participating countries vary for each topical module. Registration is required. 1998-2007 is also available in an easy to use comparative program.

  • ipoll databank (Roper)
    Archive of public opinion and survey research.

  • LAPOP - Latin American Public Opinion Project
    Surveys analyzing citizen views on system support, political tolerance, citizen participation, local government, corruption, and views on authoritarianism for Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Venezuela as well as for Albania, Israel, and Madagascar.

  • Latin America elite poll II
    537 elites were interviewed in face-to-face meetings between August 20 and October 2, 2003. Interviews were conducted in six Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela. A near-equal portion of each of the following sectors was targeted: government, media, academia, and business. For the purposes of the survey, elites are defined as high/middle-high income respondents with special knowledge of their area of interest.

  • Latin American Databank at Roper
    Public opinion surveys conducted by the survey research community in Latin America, including universities, institutes, individual scholars, private polling and public opinion research firms. To date, the collection holds nearly 1,200 studies from 16 countries, with the largest contributions coming from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela.

    Princeton has a subscription to the Roper Center. To access a study from this archive that is not online, identify it in their catalog and then send a request to a data@princeton.edu and supply the title and study number.

  • Latinobarometro (1995+)
    Summary level public opinion data for Latin America and Spain. Microdata is also available through 2015 in Stata format. Note: A survey was not conducted in 1999 or 2014.

  • Mexican Election Panel Study (2000)
    Assessed campaign influences on public opinion and voting behavior in Mexico's July 2, 2000, presidential election.

  • National Exit Poll for the 2006 Mexican Presidential Election
    Conducted by the Reforma newspaper for the coverage of the 2006 Mexican Presidential election. Respondents were asked how they voted for President, Senator, and Federal Deputy (Lower House of Congress). They were also asked about their interest in the campaigns, their opinion of all 5 presidential candidates, reasons for supporting their preferred candidate, and when they decided his/her vote choice. Respondents were queried on their approval of President Vincente Fox and asked to provide economic retrospective evaluations on both the personal and national level. Demographic variables include sex, age, education level, occupation, household income, religious denomination, frequency of church attendance, membership to labor unions, party identification, left-right self-placement, voter preference in the 2000 presidential and in the 2003 mid-term legislative elections, and whether they are beneficiaries of social programs against poverty.

    Sample Size: Used a multi-stage probability sample of precincts previously stratified by urban-rural criteria. 5,803 respondents were selected in a systematic manner throughout the day, using 3 different schedules.

  • National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Elderly Population
    Examines the responses of 761 individuals among the elderly population in Mexico. These individuals were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; how they feel society generally treats them; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their age; what action should be taken to prevent elderly discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination towards the elderly population; the life opportunities of the elderly; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination towards the elderly has changed over the years.

  • National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Religious Minorities
    Examines the responses of 789 individuals with non-Catholic religious beliefs in Mexico. These religious minorities were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their religious beliefs; whether or not Catholics have more privileges in society; what action should be taken to prevent religious discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination toward religious minorities; the life opportunities of religious minorities; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination toward religious minorities has changed over the years.

  • Pew Global Attitudes Project
    Worldwide public opinion surveys that encompasses a broad array of subjects ranging from people's assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day. Topics have included views of Asian nations of each other, Muslims in Europe, images of the United States, the Iraq War, and foreign policy. Surveys include different nations and topics by year.

  • Politics and the Migrant Poor in Mexico City, 1970-1972
    Comparative study of male migrants and their city-born neighbors living in 6 relatively small, predominately low-income communities on the periphery of Mexico City. Dealt with a relatively small group of people in a limited number of localities at a particular point in time. The research addressed several broad theoretical and empirical problems such as the most important incentives and disincentives for political involvement, the effect a large group of people entering the political arena has on the functioning of the political system, how the individual citizen -- and especially the disadvantaged citizen -- can manipulate the political system to satisfy their needs, the process by which individuals form images of politics and the political system, the process by which individuals assume a role of participation or non-participation in political activity, what occurs at the "grass roots" of a nation's political system, and how political activity at that level affects system outputs. Attempted to place the low-income migrant in a social and political context, and focused on the nature and frequency of interactions between the research communities and external actors, especially political and government officials. Demographic variables include age, race, socio-economic status, marital status, dwelling unit type, and religious preference.

  • Polling the Nations
    Compilation of public opinion surveys conducted in the United States and more than 100 other countries. Each record includes the question asked and the responses given, the polling organization responsible for the work, the date the information was released, the sample size, and the groups or areas included in the interview.

  • University of Campinas Public Opinion Databank
    Large Brazilian archive of public opinion polls. Searching and documentation is in Portuguese, but many files are freely available for download.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Brazil, 1964
    Surveyed a sample of university engineering students in Brazil to give a picture of social, economic, political, and psychological aspects of university life. Educational background information was obtained through extensive questions about the respondents' secondary school education and subjects studied, as well as the levels of education that both their parents and grandparents had achieved. Respondents were further queried about the function of the university and the best qualities of the professors. One portion of the survey probed the respondents' attitudes and outlook on life: the importance of maintaining family ties, acceptance of authority, moral responsibility, and the negative aspects of human nature as evidenced in wars and political corruption. The respondents' interest in national and international affairs was explored through variables concerning politics, political parties, and internationally known heads of state. Demographic information includes age and marital status.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Colombia, 1964
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, gender, marital status, and occupation, if applicable.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Mexico, 1962
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Panama, 1964
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Uruguay, 1966
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • Voice of the People Series (2005+)
    Annual survey to solicit public opinion on social and political issues. Every year the survey will be conducted in approximately 50 countries, with a minimal sample size of 500 per country. Wherever possible, within each country a nationally representative sample n=500 adults, male and female, aged 18 and older will be used. In some emergent countries, where such research conditions are not possible, there may be stated variations to this (e.g. urban areas only). Similarly, in the developed world interviews will be conducted by telephone, while in emergent and under-developed countries face to face interviews will be conducted. Demographic variables include sex, age, household income, education level, employment status, and religious preference.

  • Voting Attitudes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1960
    Conducted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 1960, two to four weeks before the presidential election. The study first established the amount of political information that respondents had received through the news media. Further questions ascertained their interest in the coming election, their past voting decisions, and their party preferences. The respondents' perceptions of social class rating and their ideas about the distribution of wealth and improvement of living conditions were also explored. Demographic data include the respondents' occupation, education, age, marital status, race, sex, and socioeconomic status.

  • World Public Opinion.org
    Program on International Policy Attitudes site providing public opinion from around the world.

  • World Values Survey (WVS)
    Designed to enable a crossnational comparison of values and norms on a wide variety of topics and to monitor changes in values and attitudes across the globe. A variety of questions on religion and morality were included. Coverage includes: Albania - 1998, 2002; Algeria - 2002, 2014; Andorra - 2005; Argentina - 1991, 1995, 1999, 2006, 2013; Armenia - 1997, 2011; Australia - 1995, 2005, 2012; Austria - 1990, 1999; Azerbaijan - 1997, 2011-2012; Bahrain (2014); Bangladesh - 1996, 2002; Belarus - 1996, 2000, 2011; Belgium - 1981, 1990, 1999; Bosnia and Herzegovinia - 1998, 2001; Brazil - 1990, 1997, 2006, 2014; Bulgaria - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2006; Burkina Faso - 2007; Canada - 1982, 1990, 2000, 2006; Chile - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2006; China - 1990, 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Colombia - 1998, 2005, 2012; Croatia - 1996, 1999; Cyprus - 2006, 2011; Czech Republic - 1991, 1998, 1999; Denmark - 1981, 1990, 1999; Dominican Republic - 1998; Ecuador - 2013; Egypt - 2000, 2008, 2012; El Salvador - 1999; Estonia - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2011; Ethiopia - 2007; Finland - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005; France - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006; Georgia - 1996, 2008, 2014; Germany - 2006, 2013; Germany East - 1990, 1997; Germany West - 1981, 1990, 1997; Ghana - 2007, 2011; Great Britain - 1981, 1990, 1998, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Greece - 1999; Hong Kong - 2005, 2013; Hungary - 1991, 1998, 1999; Iceland - 1984, 1990, 1999; India - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2014; Indonesia - 2001, 2006; Iran - 2003, 2005; Iraq - 2006, 2013; Ireland - 1981, 1990, 1999; Israel - 2001; Italy - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2005; Japan - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010; Jordan - 2007, 2014; Kazakhstan - 2011; Kuwait - 2013; Kyrgyzstan - 2003, 2011; Lativa - 1990, 1996, 1999; Lebanon - 2013; Libya - 2013; Lithuania - 1990, 1997, 1999; Luxembourg - 1999; Macedonia - 1998, 2001; Malaysia - 2006, 2011; Mali - 2007; Malta - 1983, 1991, 1999; Mexico - 1995, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2012; Moldova - 1996, 2006; Montenegro - 1996, 2001; Morocco - 2001, 2007, 2011; Netherlands - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006, 2012; New Zealand - 1998, 2004, 2011; Nigeria - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2011; Northern Ireland - 1981, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Norway - 1990, 1996, 2007; Pakistan - 1997, 2001, 2012; Palestine - 2013; Peru - 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Philippines - 1996, 2001, 2012; Poland - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2012; Portugal - 1990, 1999; Puerto Rico - 1995, 2001; Qatar- 2010; Romania - 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2012; Russia - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Rwanda - 2007, 2012; Saudi Arabia - 2003; Serbia - 1996, 2001, 2006; Singapore - 2002, 2012; Slovakia - 1991, 1998, 1999; Slovenia - 1992, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2011; South Africa - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2013; South Korea - 1980, 1990, 1996, 2001, 2005, 2010; Spain - 1981, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2007, 2011; Sweden - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Switzerland - 1989, 1996, 2007; Taiwan - 1995, 2006, 2012; Tanzania - 2001; Thailand - 2007, 2013; Trinidad and Tobago - 2006, 2010; Turkey - 1990, 1997, 2001, 2007, 2011; Uganda - 2001; Ukraine - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; United Kingdom - 2006 (also see Great Britain and Northern Ireland); United States - 1982, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, 2011; Uruguay - 1996, 2006, 2011; Uzbekistan - 2011; Venezuela - 1996, 2000; Vietnam - 2001, 2006; Yemen - 2013; Zambia - 2007; and Zimbabwe - 2001, 2011.

This page last updated: October 21, 2009