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Finding Data: Data on Crime - Canada

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Data and Statistics
    Statistical reports on the tracing of firearms on behalf of thousands of Federal, State, local and foreign law enforcement agencies; firearms manufacturers & export reports; firearms commerce reports; federal firearms licensee statistics theft / loss reports; and National Firearms Act (NFA) data.

  • Cross-National Comparison of Interagency Coordination Between Law Enforcement and Public Health
    Examined strategies for interagency coordination in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Ireland. Primary goal was to produce promising practices that will help law enforcement and public health agencies improve interagency coordination related to terrorist threats, as well as other public health emergencies. Phase I of this study used the Surveillance System Inventory (SSI). The SSI is a database that documents and describes public health and public safety surveillance systems in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Ireland. The purpose of the SSI was to summarize the status of coordination between law enforcement and public health agencies across these systems, as well as to highlight potentially useful systems for coordination and dual-use integration.

  • General Social Survey (Canada)
    Surveys from a sample selected across the 10 provinces. The 2 primary objectives are a) to gather data on social trends in order to monitor changes in the living conditions and wellbeing of Canadians over time; and b) to provide immediate information on specific social policy issues of current or emerging interest. Each survey contains a core topic, focus or exploratory questions and a standard set of socio-demographic questions used for classification. More recent cycles have also included some qualitative questions which explore perceptions. For all cycles except Cycle 16, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycle 16 only sampled persons aged 45 and older. Until 1998, the sample size was approximately 10,000 persons. This was increased in 1999 to 25,000.
    Cycle 1, Health and social support, 1985.
    Cycle 2, Time use, social mobility and language use, 1986
    Cycle 3, Personal risk, 1988
    Cycle 4, Education, work and retirement, 1989
    Cycle 5, Family and friends, 1990
    Cycle 6, Health, 1991
    Cycle 7, Time use, 1992
    Cycle 8, Personal risk, 1993
    Cycle 9, Education, work and retirement, 1994
    Cycle 10. Family, 1995
    Cycle 11, Social and community support, 1996
    Cycle 12, Time use, 1998
    Cycle 13, Victimization, 1999
    Cycle 14, Access to and use of information communication, 2000
    Cycle 15, Family history, 2001
    Cycle 16, Aging and social support, 2002
    Cycle 17, Social engagement, 2003
    Cycle 18, Victimization, 2004.
    Cycle 19, Time use, 2005.
    Cycle 20, Family Transitions, 2006.
    Cycle 21, Family, Social Support and Retirement, 2007.
    Cycle 22, Social Networks, 2008.
    Cycle 23, Victimization, 2009.
    Cycle 24, Time-Stress and Well-Being, 2010.
    Cycle 25, Families, 2011.
    Cycle 26, Social Support and Aging, 2012
    Cycle 27, Giving, Volunteering, Participating, 2013
    Cycle 28, Victimization, 2014
    Cycle 29, Time Use, 2015

  • International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) Series
    Most far-reaching program of standardized sample surveys to look at a householders' experience with crime, policing, crime prevention, and feelings of insecurity in a large number of nations. It also allows for analysis of how risks of crime vary among different groups of populations across social and demographic lines. Also see the ICVS site which also includes the latest rounds.
  • Wave 1 - 1989 - 14 countries
    Wave 2 - 1992 - 12 countries
    Wave 3 - 1996/1997 - 13 countries
    Wave 4 - 2000/2001 - 16 countries
    Wave 5 - 2004/2005 - 30 countries

Sample Size: Generally, 1,000 - 2,000 households from each participating country.

  • Second International Self-Reported Delinquency Study, 2005-2007
    International collaborative study of delinquency and victimization of 12 to 15 year-old students in seventh, eighth, and ninth grade classrooms. School-based study that drew on random samples from either city level or national level. In general, the cross-national description of the prevalence and incidence of delinquent behavior allowed for the assessment of national crime rates by comparison with the crime rates of other countries. The study was conducted in 31 mostly European countries, the United States, Caribbean and South American countries. The primary research questions explored included: Is juvenile delinquency normal, ubiquitous, and transitional? Is there a pattern of similarity in the offending behavior of juveniles across countries or are there any important differences? Descriptive comparisons of crime rates will call for explanations, especially if differences are observed. What are the national socio-economic or cultural differences, or the characteristics of legal or criminal policies that can explain such differences?

  • United Nations International Study on Firearm Regulation
    Country-level survey dealing with:
    • Firearm regulation, including issues of ownership, possession and use;
    • Manufacturing and trade;
    • Smuggling and other illegal dealings;
    • Demographic, accident and crime statistics;
    • Policy and public education initiatives;

    The survey instrument was distributed to Member States in 1996. The data is in a MS Access database. Data may also be used to compare social attitudes toward guns and gun control among countries.

    Sample Size: 78 countries.

  • United Nations Surveys of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems
    Collects data on the incidence of reported crime and the operations of criminal justice systems with a view to improving the analysis and dissemination of that information globally. Results provide an overview of trends and interrelationships between various parts of the criminal justice system to promote informed decision-making in administration, nationally and internationally. The surveys were started in 1977, covering 5-year intervals from 1970-1994. Starting in 1995 surveys cover 2 or 3 year intervals. Data may also be accessed through ICPSR.

    This page last updated: October 21, 2009