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Finding Data: Data on Race, Ethnicity, Ethnic relations - Latin America & the Carribean

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • Adaptation Process of Cuban and Haitian Refugees
    Survey of refugees to southern Florida, includes 514 Cubans arriving in 1980 in the Mariel boat lift and 500 Haitians arriving between 1980 and 1982. Stratified multi-stage sample; Cuban sample interviewed in 1983 and again in 1985-6; Haitians sampled after arrival in 1980-82 and again 2 years later.

  • CEAP data
    Survey of racial and other social attitudes in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. As the Program Officer with the Ford Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Edward Telles was responsible for funding both the CEAP and PESB 2000 data collection projects.

  • Comparative Immigrant Entrepreneurship Project (CIEP) (1992, 1995)
    Survey of over 1,200 Colombian, Dominican, and Salvadoran family heads is the first to explicitly measure the extent of economic, political, and socio-cultural transnationalism among immigrants and to develop predictive models of these activities.

  • Comparative Immigrant Organization Project (CIOP)
    This survey of 89 Colombian, Dominican, and Mexican organization leaders and additional interviews with community activists and government officials is part of a larger study of the organizations constructed by Latin American immigrants in the United States and their impact on the political incorporation of these immigrants to American society. This specific dataset was designed to give us greater understanding of the forces creating and sustaining these organizations and to test several preliminary hypotheses about the effects of contexts of exit and modes of incorporation in receiving countries on the character of immigrant transnationalism. Accordingly, there are detailed measures of the extent of economic, political, and socio-cultural transnationalism and characteristics of both the organizations and their members.

  • Cuban and Mexican Immigrants in the U.S.
    The aim of this longitudinal study, based on data on Cuban and Mexican immigrants to the USA collected in 1973-74, was to map the process of immigrant adaptation and incorporation into the labor market. Follow-ups in 1976 and 1979.

  • Data Folha Survey of Racial Attitudes of 1995
    Survey of racial attitudes and perceptions in Brazil.

  • Latin American Migration Project (LAMP)
    Born as an extension of the Mexican Migration Project (MMP), which was created in 1982 by an interdisciplinary team of researchers to advance our understanding of the complex processes of international migration and immigration to the United States. Data from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Peru, Haiti and Colombia are available, and can be downloaded from this website.

  • Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures
    Contains 69 new indices for race, ethnicity, language, religion, income, and geography.

  • Mexican Origin People in the United States: the 1979 Chicano Survey
    Household survey of persons of Mexican descent living in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, and Chicago, Illinois. The purpose was to compile a statistically representative and comprehensive body of empirical information about the social, economic, and psychological status of Chicanos. Major topics covered were mental and physical health and use of health services, family background and composition, customary practices and values, language use and attitudes, employment history, social identity, group consciousness, and political opinions and participation.

    Sample Size: Of over 11,000 people screened, 1,400 met the Mexican ancestry criterion. Of this total, 991 interviews were collected.

  • Minorities at Risk (MAR) Project (1945+)
    Tracks 282 politically-active ethnic groups throughout the world -- identifying where they are, what they do, and what happens to them. Focuses specifically on ethnopolitical groups, non-state communal groups that have "political significance" in the contemporary world because of their status and political actions. Political significance is determined by: (1) The group collectively suffers, or benefits from, systematic discriminatory treatment compared to other groups in a society and (2) The group is the basis for political mobilization and collective action in defense or promotion of its self-defined interests.

  • Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections
    Interviews were conducted from January 16 - February 6, 2006 among a representative sample of 987 Mexican respondents age 18 and older. A total of 62 are registered to vote and 922 are not registered to vote.

  • Project on Ethnicity and Race in Latin America (PERLA)
    Goal is to empirically examine numerous dimensions of race and ethnicity across Latin America. Includes in-depth ethnicity and race surveys in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.

This page last updated: October 21, 2009