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Finding Data: Data on Frequently used data

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • "Census Microdata Holdings"
    Table listing microdata from international censuses either available at Princeton University or publicly accesible. Note that many are restricted and require permission from the national government to use.

  • "Source Indexes to Statistics"
    Indexes to sources of statistics from the United States government, states, Canada, intergovernmental and nongovernmental agencies, and private organizations and associations. Includes "Proquest Statistical Insight", "Tablebase", and "Canadian Research Index".

  • Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) Series (1960-1961, 1972-1973, 1980+)
    Formerly called the Survey of Consumer Expenditures. Provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The unit of analysis is the consumer unit, consisting of all members of a particular housing unit who are related by blood, marriage, adoption, or some other legal arrangement. Consumer unit determination for unrelated persons is based on financial independence.

  • Current Population Survey (CPS) (1962+)
    Monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A detailed demographic supplement is conducted annually in March, and supplements on other topics, including computer use and school enrollment, are also conducted regularly. Listings documenting the occurrence of current population survey supplements by topic and month are available. Questionnaires and codebooks are available at the Census Bureau site. For comparisons of CPS, Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, see the comparison chart. See the Current Population Reports series for summary reports and methodological papers. While geography is at the state, county, or metropolitan statistical area level, one should use with caution for detailed geography due to the sample size.

  • Data-Planet Datasets (formerly Proquest Statistical Datasets)
    Wide variety of economic, social, environmental, political, and marketing indicators from many US government agencies as well as international bodies. Includes IMF's International Financial Statistics, Direction of Trade (1980+), Balance of Payments, and Government Finance Statistics (1990+).

  • General Social Survey (1972-2012) (GSS)
    Produced biennially since 1994, the GSS is a long running survey of social, cultural and political indicators. In addition to the GSS, topic modules, designed to investigate new issues or to expand the coverage of an existing subject, are administered. Examples of topic modules include computer and Internet, racial and ethnic prejudice, and child mental-health stigma. The GSS has participated since 1985 in the International Social Survey Program. A listing of modules is available.

    Sample Size: Over the life of the survey, more than 43,000 respondents, with about 3,000 added biennially.

  • Monitoring the Future. 1976+
    Ongoing study of the behaviors, attitudes, and values of American secondary school students, college students, and young adults. Each year, a total of some 50,000 8th, 10th and 12th grade students are surveyed. A number of questions on drug use are asked.

    Sample Size: 8th grade - approx. 18,000; 10th grade - approx. 17,000; 12th grade - approx. 16,000.

  • National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS) 1988
    Sample of 8th-graders surveyed in 1988 on a range of topics. Survey topics beyond schoolwork include smoking, drug use, and extracurricular activities. A sample were resurveyed through four follow-ups in 1990, 1992, 1994, and 2000. The study has four types of data files - student, teacher, parent, and school - although note each type is available for each survey year. The data are also available on CD; ask for ED1.334/2:ED 8/988-2000/CD. Also see the NCES Bibliography for literature that has used this data.

    Sample Size: In 1988, the cohort size was almost 25,000 students from over 1,000 public and private schools.

  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Waves I-IV, 1994-2008 (Add Health)
    Collected data for the purpose of providing information on the general health and well-being of adolescents in the United States, including, with respect to such adolescents, information on: (1) the behaviors that promote health and the behaviors that are detrimental to health; and (2) the influence on health of factors particular to the communities in which adolescents reside. Wave IV consists of data from the most recent of 4 in-home interviews which have followed a nationally representative sample of adolescents since they were in grades 7-12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Wave IV interviews were completed in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32. The study combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Documentation can also be found on the AddHealth site.

  • National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997
    Designed to document the transition from school to work and into adulthood. Collects extensive information about youths' labor market behavior and educational experiences over time. Also included is a survey of the biological children of women in the NLSY79. Documentation is available at the NLS site. See the NLS Investigator guide. For comparisons of National Longitudinal Surveys, Survey of Income and Program Participation, and Panel Study of Income Dynamics, see the comparison chart. Also see Finke and Huston. A separate file "Recidivism in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 - Standalone Data (Rounds 1 to 13)" contains recidivism data.

    Sample Size: The 1979 survey began with over 12,000 participants, while the 1997 survey began with approx. 9,000.

    Citation:
    National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 (Electronic File)
    Principal investigator: Ohio State University. Center for Human Resource Research.
    Producer: Ohio State University, Center for Human Resource Research and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    Distributor: Ohio State University. Center for Human Resource Research.

  • Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) Series. 1968+
    Designed to fill the need for a better understanding of the determinants of family income and its changes. Longitudinal survey of US individuals and the families in which they reside. Can be used for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intergenerational analysis and for studying both individuals and families. For comparisons of Current Population Survey, Survey of Income and Program Participation, and PSID, see the comparison chart. For comparisons of National Longitudinal Surveys, Survey of Income and Program Participation, and PSID, see the comparison chart. Includes section on education, food, health, housing, psychological state, and religion. Includes various supplemental surveys including: (1) Disability and Use of Time (DUST): collected information from roughly 400 older couples about disability, time use, and well-being during telephone interviews conducted shortly after the 2009 Main Interview.; (2) Child Development Supplement (CDS): In 1997 information on PSID children ages 0-12 was obtained through extensive interviews with the child, their primary caregiver, secondary caregiver, absent parent, teacher, and school administrator. Information was collected again in 2002/2003 and 2007/2008 for children in this cohort who remained under 18. Information includes a broad array of developmental outcomes including physical health, emotional well-being, intellectual and academic achievement, cognitive ability, social relationships with family and peers, time diaries, and much more and 3) Housing, Mortgage Stress, and Wealth Data (2009, 2001, 2013) as well as Wealth files for 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. For an overview, see its Resource Guide. (3) Transition into Adulthood: When children in the CDS cohort are older than 18 and have left high school, information is obtained about their circumstances. This study has been implemented in 2005, and biennially thereafter. Information includes measures of time use, psychological functioning, marriage, family, responsibilities, employment and income, education and career goals, health, social environment, religiosity, and outlook on life. Geography is down to the state level.

  • Survey of Consumer Finances. 1947-1971, 1977, 1983+
    Since 1983, conducted every 3 years. Collects information on the assets, liabilities and other financial characteristics of households. Only U.S. survey that contains an oversample of wealthy households. For data prior to 1983, see ICPSR. For an overview, see Hanna, Lindamood, and Huston.

    Sample Size: About 4,500 families are interviewed in the main study.

  • Survey of Income and Program Participation. (SIPP) 1984+
    Longitudinal U. S. government survey of the financial status of American households conducted since 1983 (data starts with 1984). Covers government transfer and service programs, pension coverage, housing affordability, home ownership data, housing cost data (primarily mortgages), financial assistance for education, among other topics. Data may also be accessed via ICPSR. The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) makes the SIPP data and documentation available along with Stata, SPSS, and SAS programs for reading the data. Users may find the NBER site the most convenient source, but the most recent data may not be available there. A new sample (panel) is introduced at the beginning of each calendar year, and the duration of each panel ranges from 2 1/2 years to 4 years. Panels also contain topical modules. Data is at the state level. For comparisons of the Current Population Survey, SIPP, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, see the comparison chart. See the Household Economic Studies (P70) series for summary reports.

    Sample Size: Ranges from approx. 14,000 to 37,000 households. Interviews are conducted with those 15 and over.

  • U. S. Census - IPUMS. 1850+
    Public use samples of individual-level data from the U. S. census.

  • World Values Survey (WVS) and European Values Study (EVS). (1981+)
    Designed to enable a crossnational comparison of values and norms on a wide variety of topics and to monitor changes in values and attitudes across the globe. A variety of questions on religion and morality were included. Data is also contained in the UKDA. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA. For more on the European Values Study and the World Values Survey, see their homepages. Coverage includes: Albania - 1998, 2002; Algeria - 2002; Andorra - 2005; Argentina - 1991, 1995, 1999, 2006; Armenia - 1997; Australia - 1995, 2005; Austria - 1990, 1999; Azerbaijan - 1997; Bangladesh - 1996, 2002; Belarus - 1996, 2000; Belgium - 1981, 1990, 1999; Bosnia and Herzegovinia - 1998, 2001; Brazil - 1990, 1997, 2006; Bulgaria - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2006; Burkina Faso - 2007; Canada - 1982, 1990, 2000, 2006; Chile - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2006; China - 1990, 1995, 2001, 2006; Colombia - 1998, 2005; Croatia - 1996, 1999; Cyprus - 2006; Czech Republic - 1991, 1998, 1999; Denmark - 1981, 1990, 1999; Dominican Republic - 1998; Egypt - 2000, 2008; El Salvador - 1999; Estonia - 1990, 1996, 1999; Ethiopia - 2007; Finland - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005; France - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006; Georgia - 1996, 2008; Germany - 2006; Germany East - 1990, 1997; Germany West - 1981, 1990, 1997; Ghana - 2007; Great Britain - 1981, 1990, 1998, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Greece - 1999; Hong Kong - 2005; Hungary - 1991, 1998, 1999; Iceland - 1984, 1990, 1999; India - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006; Indonesia - 2001, 2006; Iran - 2003, 2005; Iraq - 2006; Ireland - 1981, 1990, 1999; Israel - 2001; Italy - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2005; Japan - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005; Jordan - 2007; Kyrgyzstan - 2003; Lativa - 1990, 1996, 1999; Lithuania - 1990, 1997, 1999; Luxembourg - 1999; Macedonia - 1998, 2001; Malaysia - 2006; Mali - 2007; Malta - 1983, 1991, 1999; Mexico - 1995, 1996, 2000, 2005; Moldova - 1996, 2006; Montenegro - 1996, 2001; Morocco - 2001, 2007; Netherlands - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006; New Zealand - 1998, 2004; Nigeria - 1990, 1995, 2000; Northern Ireland - 1981, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Norway - 1990, 1996, 2007; Pakistan - 1997, 2001; Peru - 1995, 2001, 2006; Philippines - 1996, 2001; Poland - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2005; Portugal - 1990, 1999; Puerto Rico - 1995, 2001; Romania - 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005; Russia - 1996, 1999, 2006; Rwanda - 2007; Saudi Arabia - 2003; Serbia - 1996, 2001, 2006; Singapore - 2002; Slovakia - 1991, 1998, 1999; Slovenia - 1992, 1995, 1999, 2005; South Africa - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006; South Korea - 1980, 1990, 1996, 2001, 2005; Spain - 1981, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2007; Sweden - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2006; Switzerland - 1989, 1996, 2007; Taiwan - 1995, 2006; Tanzania - 2001; Thailand - 2007; Trinidad and Tobago - 2006; Turkey - 1990, 1997, 2001, 2007; Uganda - 2001; Ukraine - 1996, 1999, 2006; United Kingdom - 2006 (also see Great Britain and Northern Ireland); United States - 1982, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006; Uruguay - 1996, 2006; Venezuela - 1996, 2000; Vietnam - 2001, 2006; Zambia - 2007; and Zimbabwe - 2001.

This page last updated: October 21, 2009