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Finding Data: Data on Mexico

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • "Census Microdata Holdings"
    Table listing microdata from international censuses either available at Princeton University or publicly accesible. Note that many are restricted and require permission from the national government to use.

  • Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey, 2003
    Large-scale co-operative effort undertaken in 2003 by governments, national statistics agencies, research institutions and multi-lateral agencies. The ALL study builds on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), the world's first internationally comparative survey of adult skills undertaken in 3 rounds of data collection between 1994 and 1998. The foundation skills measured in the ALL survey include prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Additional skills assessed indirectly include familiarity with and use of information and communication technologies. This dataset is composed of 7 countries or regions that collected data in 2003. They include Bermuda, Canada, Italy, Norway, Switzerland, the United States and the Mexican State of Nuevo Leon.

  • America Latina y el Caribe. Balanza de Pagos, 1980-2005
    Balance of payments data from CEPAL for Latin America and the Caribbean.

  • America's Barometer (2004+)
    Public opinion data for Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad, United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Once in the database click on "Enter site via IP authentication" then online data analysis. Click on either Beginner or Expert and then choose your database.

  • Arms Transfers to Developing Countries, 1945-1968
    Data on the transfer of arms to 52 developing nations. The Arms Transfers data (Part 1) provide information on donor and recipient, date and site of transfer, quantity, system classification (e.g., aircraft, helicopters, missiles, artilleries, small arms, or naval systems), and date production began and ended. The Weapons Systems data (Part 2) contain detailed coded information about each weapons system.

  • Auditorias Superiores Locales: Evaluacion de su normatividad, practicas y transparencia (Local Audit Institutions: Evaluation of its norms, practices and transparency)
    Shows the current state of control systems in the states in Mexico.

  • Banco de Informacion para la Investigacion Aplicada en Ciencias Sociales (BIIACS)
    Public opinion data on a variety of social, political and economic issues in Mexico. Free registration is required.

  • Border Contraceptive Access Study, El Paso, Texas 2005-2008
    Oral contraceptive (OC) users living in El Paso, Texas were interviewed to assess motivations for patronizing a United States clinic or a Mexican pharmacy with over-the-counter (OTC) pills and to determine which women were likely to use the OTC option. The experiences of OC users who obtained their contraception from Mexican pharmacies were compared with those of women who obtained their pills from family planning clinics in El Paso, Texas, where eligible low-income women often pay nothing. 532 clinic users and 514 pharmacy users were surveyed about background characteristics, motivations for choosing their oral contraception source, and satisfaction with this source.

  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Data and Statistics
    Statistical reports on the tracing of firearms on behalf of thousands of Federal, State, local and foreign law enforcement agencies; firearms manufacturers & export reports; firearms commerce reports; federal firearms licensee statistics theft / loss reports; and National Firearms Act (NFA) data.

  • Business Practices in Small Firms in Developing Countries 2008-2014
    Contains information from surveys of micro and small enterprises conducted in Bangladesh, Chile, Ghana, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, and Sri Lanka between 2008 and 2014. Researchers from the World Bank and the University of Warwick developed a survey instrument with 26 questions that measured business practices in marketing, stock-keeping, record-keeping, and financial planning. The goal was to examine the relationship between management practices and firm outcomes.

  • Characteristics of Municipios: Data from the 1950 and 1960 Censuses of Mexico
    Contains socio-economic characteristics of the population of each municipio: occupational and industrial structure, educational attainment, migration, urbanization, bilingualism, etc. Requires free registration.

  • Citizen Disenchantment in Mexico (national survey, June 2006)
    Gauges citizen definitions of democracy (including a 12-item battery on electoral, liberal, and substantive conceptualizations of democracy) and evaluations of Mexican democracy. It also includes a 15-item battery on migration experiences. The survey is organized into 8 sections: (1) Political Participation and Preferences; (2) Political Interest; (3) Migration and Remittances; (4) General Concepts about Democracy; (5) Evaluation of Democracy in Mexico; (6) Support for Democracy; (7) Political Knowledge; and (8) Sociodemographic Data.

  • Citizenship, Democracy, and Drug-Related Violence (CIDENA, 2011)
    Implemented with the goal of providing information towards understanding the complex relationship between society and drug-related violence in Mexico. Cognitive interviews, face-to-face interviews, and list experiments were utilized in Mexico. Conducted in face-to-face interviews (at the residence of the interviewee) based on a sample of men and women over 18 years of age and residents of Mexico. The sample was representative nationwide of 7 states with different levels of violence: High (Chihuahua, Guerrero, Michoacan, and Nuevo Leon), Intermediate (Jalisco, and Estado de Mexico), and Low (Distrito Federal). These states were selected according to their violence indexes (deaths associated with drug related violence reported in local newspapers). Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, occupation, party affiliation, territories of residence, education, and income.

  • Climate Change and African Political Stability
    Analyzes how climate change, conflict, governance, and aid intersect to impact African and international security. Includes mapping tools, a climate vulnerability model, and the following datasets: Social Conflict Analysis Database (SCAD) (includes Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean). , Armed Conflict Location and Event Dataset (ACLED) , Malawi Geocoded and Climate Aid Dataset, and the Sub-National African Education and Infrastructure Access Data.

  • Committee to Protect Journalists
    Provides data on journalists killed, imprisoned, exiled, or missing. Also includes attacks on the press.

  • Comparative Immigrant Organization Project (CIOP)
    This survey of 89 Colombian, Dominican, and Mexican organization leaders and additional interviews with community activists and government officials is part of a larger study of the organizations constructed by Latin American immigrants in the United States and their impact on the political incorporation of these immigrants to American society. This specific dataset was designed to give us greater understanding of the forces creating and sustaining these organizations and to test several preliminary hypotheses about the effects of contexts of exit and modes of incorporation in receiving countries on the character of immigrant transnationalism. Accordingly, there are detailed measures of the extent of economic, political, and socio-cultural transnationalism and characteristics of both the organizations and their members.

  • Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES)
    Collaborative program of cross-national research among election studies conducted in over fifty states. The CSES is composed of three tightly linked parts: First, a common module of public opinion survey questions is included in each participant country's post-election study. These "micro" level data include vote choice, candidate and party evaluations, current and retrospective economic evaluations, evaluation of the electoral system itself, in addition to standardized sociodemographic measures. Second, district level data are reported for each respondent, including electoral returns, turnout, and the number of candidates. Finally, system or "macro" level data report aggregate electoral returns, electoral rules and formulas, and regime characteristics.

    Covers the United States as well as a number of European democracies, some in Latin America and the Caribbean, and Asia.

  • Comparative Survey of Freedom, 1972-1976
    Contains information gathered in 5 annual surveys that assessed the degree of freedom in 218 nations and dependencies. Was carried out under the auspices of Freedom House, New York City. The number of cases with data varies from year to year, due to annexation, amalgamation, or the addition of further territories to the roster. Data includes assessments of the political and civil rights of the general population (using a seven-point scale, i.e., 1, most freedom, to 7, least freedom), an overall freedom rating for the country (using a three-point scale, i.e, free, partly free, and not free), and the direction in which this rating appeared to be moving. Surveys after 1972 have added variables that indicate whether a change in the evaluation since the previous survey was due to internal events in the country or to new information about existing conditions. Before 1973, only the presence or absence of change is noted. Thereafter, an increase in the number of coding categories enables the direction of the change to be recorded. The 1976 data include 4 additional variables applicable to 142 cases and provide information about the system of government and the economy of most of the nations studied.

  • Constituency-Level Elections Archive (CLEA)
    Repository of detailed results - including votes received by each candidate/party, total votes cast, number of eligible voters, and seat figures where available - at a constituency level for the lower house legislative elections that have been conducted around the world. The dataset and documentation currently include 1,720 elections from 142 countries. Future releases are being planned that will include more countries & additional elections. Data available in SAS, STATA, SPSS, and raw data formats.

  • Correlates of War (1816+)
    Quantitative data useful for studying international relations. Also includes war within political entities.

  • Country Memberships in Selected Intergovernmental Organizations and Accession to Selected Regional and Global Treaty Regimes: Global, Country-Year Format, 1955-2010
    Listing of organizational memberships by country and year.

  • Coups d'Etat 1946-2016
    Event list includes successful, attempted, plotted, and alleged coup events reported in Keesings Record of World Events (Keesings Online) and other sources; successful coups are cross-referenced to the Polity IV data series to distinguish "adverse regime changes" from "autocratic coups"; also listed in the codebook are cases of leadership change that are not considered coups (e.g., assassinations, ouster by foreign forces, victory by rebel forces).

  • Cross-National Indicators of Liberal Democracy (1950-1990)
    Collection of crossnational measures of political democracy containing over 800 variables for most of the world's independent countries. Political, social, and economic measures are available in the data file, and topics include adult suffrage, civil liberties, political rights, the openness, fairness, and competitiveness of the electoral process, executive and legislative selection and effectiveness, political party legitimacy, political participation, limitations on the executive branch of the government, level of democratization, economic openness, constitutional development, government legitimacy, and the outlook for freedom. A series of variables focuses on freedom and barriers to freedom, including freedom of peaceful assembly and association, mail censorship, women's rights, freedom of information and technology, freedom of political opposition, and freedom of the press. Compulsory membership in state organizations and political parties and compulsory religion in schools are addressed as well.

  • Cross-national Nonstandard Work Data
    Country-level dataset with indicators of part-time work and other forms of nonstandard employment based on a sample of 50 countries between 2000 and 2010. The original sources for this dataset include the OECD, Eurostat, International Social Survey Programee, and ESS.

  • Cross-National Statistics on the Causes of Death (1966-1974)
    Demographic statistics for the populations of 125 countries or areas throughout the world. Units of analysis are both country and data year. Includes statistics on approximately 50 types of causes of death for males, females, and total populations.

  • Cross-National Time-Series Data Archive
    Covers economic, social, and political indicators of nations and empires of the world, including countries and empires that no longer exist. Select data goes back to 1815. Not all indicators are available for all countries or in all years (even years in which the country existed). Often referred to as Bank's Cross National Time Series.

  • Cuban and Mexican Immigrants in the U.S.
    The aim of this longitudinal study, based on data on Cuban and Mexican immigrants to the USA collected in 1973-74, was to map the process of immigrant adaptation and incorporation into the labor market. Follow-ups in 1976 and 1979.

  • Data Archive of Social Research on Aging (DASRA)
    Contains various large surveys for the USA: Longitudinal Study of Aging, 1984-1990; Longitudinal Retirement History Study, 1969-1979; Second Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSOA II): Baseline (Second Supplement on Aging (SOA II), 1994-1996) and Wave 2, Survivor and Decedent Files, 1994-1998, and Wave 3 Survivor and Decedent Files, 1999-2000; National Long-Term Care Survey: 1982, 1984, 1989; Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (Hispanic EPESE), Waves I-IV, 1993-2001; and National Survey of Self-Care and Aging (NSSCA), 1990-1994. Also contains select international studies: National Survey of the Japanese Elderly (NSJE): Wave 1-4, 1987-1996; Study on Global Aging and Adult Health (SAGE) (China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russian Federation, and South Africa (2002-2004); and the Study on Global Aging and Adult Health (SAGE): Pilot Study, 2005. Part of Sociometrics.

  • Data Bank of Assassinations (1948-1967)
    Data on 409 assassination events that occurred in 84 countries. Covers plotted, attempted, or actual assassinations of prominent public figures, such as top government officeholders and military figures, leaders of large trade unions or religious movements, and leaders of minority groups. For each event, information is provided on the country, date, and location of occurrence, the issue involved, the identity of the assassin and of the target, such as the type of group to which the assassin belonged and the political and social position of the target, and the outcome of the event.

  • Data on International Election Monitoring: Three Global Datasets on Election Quality, Election Events and International Election Observation
    Focuses on elections and election monitoring throughout the world. Dataset 1, Data on International Election Monitoring (DIEM), codes the assessement and activities of international election monitoring organizations to national-level legislative and presidential elections in 108 countries from 1980-2004. Dataset 2, Quality of Elections Data (QED), codes the quality of national-level legislative and presidential elections in 172 countries from 1978 to 2004. Dataset 3, Supplementary Election Data, includes supplementary information on all direct presidential and legislative elections in 182 countries from 1975-2004.

  • Datos Abiertos
    Open source data from the Mexican government on a wide variety of topics.

  • Demographic and Health Surveys
    Used to evaluate population, health, and nutrition programs. Provides national and sub-national data on family planning, maternal and child health, child survival, HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted infections (STIs), infectious diseases, reproductive health and nutrition. Microdata is available free of charge by request. First check characteristics and sample sizes. See the model questionnaires and the recode manuals. Data is available for:
    • Afghanistan (2010, 2015)
    • Albania (2008/09)
    • Angola (2006/07, 2011, 2015/16)
    • Armenia (2000, 2005, 2010, 2015/16)
    • Azerbaijan (2006)
    • Bangladesh (1993/94, 1996/97, 1999-2001, 2004, 2007, 2011. 2014)
    • Benin (1996, 2001, 2006, 2011/12)
    • Bolivia (1989, 1994, 1998, 2003, 2008)
    • Botswana (1988) (restricted)
    • Brazil (1986, 1991, 1996)
    • Burkina Faso (1993, 1998/99. 2003, 2010)
    • Burundi (1987, 2010, 2012)
    • Cambodia (1998, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2014)
    • Cameroon (1991, 1998, 2004, 2011)
    • Cape Verde (2005)
    • Central African Republic (1994/95)
    • Chad (1996/97, 2004, 2014/15)
    • Colombia (1986, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015)
    • Comoros (1996, 2012)
    • Congo (Brazzaville) (2005, 2009, 2011/12)
    • Congo Democratic Republic (2007, 2013/14)
    • Cote d'Ivoire (1994, 1998/99, 2005, 2011/12)
    • Dominican Republic (1986, 1991, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2013)
    • Ecuador (1987)
    • Egypt (1988, 1992, 1995-1997, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2008, 2014, 2015)
    • El Salvador (1985)
    • Eritrea (1995, 2002) (restricted)
    • Ethiopia (2000, 2005, 2011, 2016)
    • Gabon (2000, 2012)
    • Gambia (2013]
    • Ghana (1988, 1993, 1998, 2003, 2007-2008, 2014)
    • Guatemala (1987, 1995, 1998/99, 2014/15)
    • Guinea (1999, 2005, 2012)
    • Guyana (2005, 2009)
    • Haiti (1994/95, 2000, 2005/06, 2012, 2013)
    • Honduras (2005/06, 2011/12)
    • India (19992/93, 1998/99, 2005/06)
    • Indonesia (1987, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2002-2003, 2007, 2012)
    • Jordan (1990, 1997, 2002, 2007, 2009, 2012)
    • Kazakhstan (1995, 1999)
    • Kenya (1989, 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008/09, 2014)
    • Kyrgyz Republic (1997, 2012)
    • Lesotho (2004, 2009, 2014)
    • Liberia (1986, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013)
    • Madagascar (1992, 1997, 2003/04, 2008/09, 2011, 2013)
    • Malawi (1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2010, 2012-2016)
    • Maldives (2009)
    • Mali (1987, 1995/96, 2001, 2006, 2010, 2013)
    • Mauritania (2000/01, 2003/04) (restricted)
    • Mexico (1987)
    • Moldova (2005)
    • Morocco (1987, 1992, 1995, 2003/04)
    • Mozambique (1997, 2003, 2009, 2011)
    • Myanmar (2015/2016)
    • Namibia (1992, 2000, 2006/07, 2013)
    • Nepal (1987, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2011, 2016)
    • Nicaragua (1998, 2001)
    • Niger (1992, 1998, 2006)
    • Nigeria (1990, 1999, 2003, 2008, 2010, 2013)
    • Nigeria (Ondo State) (1986)
    • Pakistan (1990/91, 2006/07, 2012/13)
    • Paraguay (1990)
    • Peru (1986, 1991/92, 1996, 2000, 2004-2012)
    • Philippines (1993, 1998, 2003, 2008, 2013)
    • Rwanda (1992, 2000, 2005, 2007/08, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014/15)
    • Sao Tome and Principe (2008/09)
    • Senegal (1986, 1992/93, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2006, 2008/09, 2010/11, 2012/13, 2014-2016)
    • Sierra Leone (2008, 2013)
    • South Africa (1998)
    • Sri Lanka (1987)
    • Sudan (1989/90)
    • Swaziland (2006/07)
    • Tajikstan (2012)
    • Tanzania (1991/92, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2003-2005, 2007/08, 2010-2012, 2015/16)
    • Thailand (1987)
    • Timor Leste (2009)
    • Togo (1988, 1998, 2013/2014)
    • Trinidad and Tobago (1987)
    • Tunisia (1988)
    • Turkey (1993, 1998, 2003)
    • Turkmenistan (2000)
    • Uganda (1988/89, 1995/96, 2000/01, 2004/05 (restricted), 2006, 2009, 2011)
    • Ukraine (2007)
    • Uzbekistan (1996, 2002)
    • Vietnam (1997, 2002, 2005)
    • Yemen (1991/92, 1997(restricted), 2013)
    • Zambia (1992, 1996, 2001/02, 2007, 2013/14)
    • Zimbabwe (1988, 1994, 1999, 2005/06, 2010/11, 2015)
    DHS data are also available through the Minnesota Population Center's Integrated Demographic and Health Series. Registered DHS dataset users can create customized, pre-merged datasets. The current IDHS database includes a subset of variables related to women of childbearing age and incorporates data from 96 samples from 21 countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivorie, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, India, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

  • Determinants of Aid in the Post-Cold War Era
    Estimates the responsiveness of aid to recipient countries' economic and physical needs, civil/political rights, and government effectiveness. Looks exclusively at the post-Cold War era and use fixed effects to control for the political, strategic, and other considerations of donors. Finds that aid and per capita income have been negatively related, while aid has been positively related to infant mortality, rights, and government effectiveness.

  • Education Statistics (World Bank)
    Worldwide data on education from national statistical reports, statistical annexes of new publications, and other data sources. Includes public expenditure data.

  • EM-DAT : the International Disaster Database
    Essential core data on the occurrence and effects of over 18,000 mass disasters in the world from 1900 to present.

  • Emprical Studies of Conflict (ESOC)
    Tabular Data include open source files compiled by or recommended by ESOC. ESOC is committed to archiving replication data and useful information on all the countries in which we work. Includes data on security policy, narcotics, conflicts, and homicides.

  • Encuesta Nacional de Addiciones (ENA) 2002
    Mexico National Addiction Survey 2002. Investigated the consumption of alcohol, tobacco, and medicinal and illicit drugs. The survey was nationally representative and respondents were 12-65 years of age. Demographic and household characteristics captured included age, sex, family composition, education, housing conditions and employment type.

  • Encuesta Nacional de Ingresos y Gastos de los Hogares (1984, 1989, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000-2005)
    Nationally representative survey of Mexican household income and expenditures. For 2006+, see the INEGI website.

  • Encuesta Nacional de Ocupacion y Empleo (ENOE), poblacion de 14 anos y mas de edad
    National Survey of Occupation and Employment ( ENOE ) , population 14 years and older for Mexico. 2005-2010.

  • Encuesta Nacional de Ocupacion y Empleo (ENOE), poblacion de 15 anos y mas de edad
    National Survey of Occupation and Employment ( ENOE ) , population 15 years and older for Mexico. 2005+.

  • Encuesta Nacional sobre Confianza del Consumidor (ENCO) (2001+)
    National Consumer Confidence Survey for Mexico.

  • Encuesta sobre Migracion en la Frontera Norte y Sur de Mexico
    Includes 2 databases: (1) provides elements based on direct and reliable information on the dynamic analysis, the magnitude and characteristics of migration of Mexican workers to the United States and (2) measures and characterizes migration from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, moving into Mexico and / or America, for the purpose of working in these countries. Free registration is required.

  • Enterprise Surveys
    Company-level data on 130,000+ firms in 135 countries (emerging markets and developing economies). Data are used to create indicators that benchmark the quality of the business and investment climate across countries. Also known as "Micro-Enterprise Survey", "Financial Crisis Survey", "Investment Survey", "Business Environment and Enterprise Performance Survey", and "Informal Survey". Registration is required.

  • ESRU Social Mobility Survey in Mexico, 2006
    First nationally representative, fully probabilistic survey of inter-generational social mobility in Mexico. The main objective of the ESRU SMSM is to describe and analyze inter-generational socioeconomic mobility in Mexican society. The SMSM is a stratified multistage sample of 7,288 men and women aged 25-64 and living in private residences in Mexico. Collects information on the socioeconomic standing of the respondent and his/her spouse or partner, including education, occupation, income, assets, and wealth. Also includes information on the socioeconomic standing of the respondent's and his/her spouse/partner's parents and conditions when they were growing up. Additional topics include: international and domestic migration, health, occupational trajectory, opinions, and attitudes.

  • Estadisticas de la dinamica laboral en Mexico 2005-2007
    Labor force statistics for Mexico divided by occupation and gender.

  • Estimating Human Trafficking into the United States [Phase I: Development of a Methodology]
    Developed and fully documented a method to estimate the number of females and males trafficked for the purposes of sexual and labor exploitation from 8 countries (Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela) into the United States at the Southwest border. The model utilizes only open source data.

  • Experiments in Financial Liberalization: The Mexican Banking Sector
    Since the liberalization of its trade in the mid-1980s, Mexico has pursued an aggressive globalization strategy, which today makes it the country with the most free trade agreements in the world. This liberalization strategy has also included the banking sector, particularly since 1997, when all restrictions to the entry of foreign banks were removed. The history of the banking sector in Mexico includes episodes of nationalization in 1982, privatization in 1992, and near-complete failure in 1995. Since then, however, the Mexican government has undertaken a series of bold reforms that have contributed to the modernization of its financial system. Documents the evolution of Mexico's banking sector starting from its nationalization in 1982 and culminating with the increased entry of foreign banks in recent years that has driven the recovery of bank credit to the private sector.

  • Forcibly Displaced Populations, 1964-2008
    World Refugee Survey series, annual, cross-national, time-series data: numbers of "source" and "host" refugees and internally displaced persons,

  • Foreign Conflict Behavior, 1950-1968
    Contains data on over 13,000 foreign conflict acts of 113 nations in the period 1950-1968. Data are provided for actor and object, either of which may refer to nations, colonies, international organizations, or groups in rebellion against national authority and involved in international relations. Data are also provided for official and unofficial acts, which are categorized into violent and nonviolent acts. Violent acts are further categorized into planned and unplanned acts, as well as unclassified acts. These include warning or defensive acts related to a developing conflict situation, threat, war, clash, or negative behavior such as blockade, embargo, or diplomatic rebuff of one nation by another. Nonviolent acts include boycott and anti-foreign demonstrations.

  • GDELT Project
    GDELT monitors print, broadcast, and web news media in over 100 languages from across every country in the world to keep continually updated on breaking developments anywhere on the planet. Its historical archives stretch back to January 1, 1979 and update daily (soon to be every 15 minutes). Through its ability to leverage the world's collective news media, GDELT moves beyond the focus of the Western media towards a far more global perspective on what's happening and how the world is feeling about it. "The GDELT Project is an initiative to construct a catalog of human societal-scale behavior and beliefs across all countries of the world, connecting every person, organization, location, count, theme, news source, and event across the planet into a single massive network that captures what's happening around the world, what its context is and who's involved, and how the world is feeling about it, every single day."

  • Generations of Talent Study
    Sought to examine several dimensions of quality of employment as experienced by today's multigenerational workforces. The primary goal was to explore how country-related factors and age-related factors affect employees' perceptions of quality of employment. Information was gathered from employees working in 11 different countries including the United States, United Kingdom, China, India, Spain, Brazil, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, South Africa, and Botswana. The industry sectors included technology, pharmaceuticals, consulting, energy, and finance. Demographic variables included gender, birth year, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, number of children, hourly wage, salary, and household income.

  • Global Barometer
    Represents the largest, most careful and systematic comparative survey of attitudes and values toward politics, power, reform, democracy and citizens' political actions in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Arabic region. Based on a common module of questions contained in regional barometer surveys; for additional regional-specific questions, see the original surveys at www.afrobarometer.org, www.arabbarometer.org, www.asianbarometer.org and www.latinobarometro.org. Cross-national comparative surveys have been implemented in 55 political systems -namely Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Palestine, Algeria, Morocco, Kuwait and Lebanon. In each of the 55 countries or regions, a national research team administers a country-wide face-to-face survey using standardized survey instruments to compile the required micro-level data under a common research framework and research methodology.

  • Global Bilateral Migration Database
    Global matrices of bilateral migrant stocks spanning the period 1960-2000, disaggregated by gender and based primarily on the foreign-born concept are presented. Over one thousand census and population register records are combined to construct decennial matrices corresponding to the last 5 completed census rounds.

  • Global Digital Activism Data Set, February 2013
    Features coded cases of online digital activism from 151 countries and dependent territories. Several features from each case of digital activism were documented, including the year and month that online action commenced, the estimated age and country of origin of the initiator(s), the geographic scope of their campaign, and whether the action was online only, or also featured offline activities. Researchers were interested in the number and types of software applications that were used by digital activists. Specifically, information was collected on whether software applications were used to circumvent censorship or evade government surveillance, to transfer money or resources, to aid in co-creation by a collaborative group, or for purposes of networking, mobilization, information sharing, or technical violence (destructive/disruptive hacking). The collection illustrates the overall focus of each case of digital activism by defining the cause advanced or defended by the action, the initiator's diagnosis of the problem and its perceived origin, the identification of the targeted audience that the campaign sought to mobilize, as well as the target whose actions the initiators aimed to influence. Finally, each case of digital activism was evaluated in terms of its success or failure in achieving the initiator's objectives, and whether any other positive outcomes were apparent.

  • Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Adult Population Survey Data Set, 1998-2012
    Designed to capture various aspects of firm creation and entrepreneurship across countries.

  • Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM): Expert Questionnaire Data, 1999-2003
    Designed to capture various aspects of firm creation and entrepreneurship across countries. Seeks to measure the national attributes considered critical for new firm births and small firm growth.

    Sample Size: 4,685 experts from over 38 countries and 3 subnational regions: Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China), and Taiwan.

  • Global Financial Inclusion (Global Findex) Database (2011+)
    Measures how people around the world - including the poor, women, and rural residents - manage their day-to-day finances and plan for the future. Expected to be conducted every 3 years. First round included 140 countries.

  • Global Terrorism Database (1970+)
    Open-source database including information on terrorist events around the world. Unlike many other event databases, includes systematic data on domestic as well as international terrorist incidents that have occurred during this time period and now includes more than 150,000 cases.

  • Global Views 2004: Mexican Public Opinion and Foreign Policy
    First ever comprehensive study of Mexican public and leadership opinion on international affairs. Designed to measure general attitudes and values concerning Mexico's relationship with the world rather than opinions on specific foreign policies or issues.

  • GlobeScan/BBC World Service Views of Countries' Poll, 2005-2009
    Major survey exploring how people in 33 countries view various countries.

  • Height of Mexican Men and Women From Military Passport Records (1870-1950)
    Constructed to ascertain the living standards of the Mexican population during the Porfiriato (1876-1910) and the first 4 decades of the Post-Revolution period. These data supply information on the individual's age, sex, year of birth, height, place of birth, place of recruitment (into the military), occupation (for passport holders), and occupation prior to recruitment.

  • Homicides (2006-2011)
    Yearly data at the municipal level on homicides reported in death certificates from 2006 to 2011 in Mexico. The certificates are issued by local offices of the Attorney General's Office.

  • Homicides presumably related to DTO rivalry (Dec 2006 - Sep 2011)
    Yearly data at the municipal level of homicides in Mexico presumably related to rivalries between Drug Trafficking Organizations. Includes deaths related to violent aggressions and confrontations between criminal groups and military and police force. The information for 2006 only includes homicides occurred in December while the information for 2011 corresponds to homicides from January to September of that year.

  • ICT Diffusion and Distribution Dataset, 1990-2007
    Contains 2 types of indicators for the global distribution of information, communication and technology (ICT) resources. Includes gini coefficients for the distribution of Internet access within countries, and a technology diffusion index that weights the distribution of broadband subscribers, personal computers, mobile phones, Internet users, and international Internet bandwidth by economic output.

  • Immigrant Identity Project (IIP)
    The Project Transnational Identities and behavior: an Ethnographic Comparison of First and Second Generation Latino Immigrants was realized under the direction of Douglas Massey and Magaly Sanchez R with funding from the Russell Sage Foundation (May 2002). The study, known in abbreviated form as the Immigrant Identity Project, was organized as a sub-project of two larger investigations: the Mexican Migration Project and the Latin American Migration Project. The project sought to conduct in-depth interviews with immigrants residing in the northeastern United States , and was originally conceived to analyze whether the construction of immigrant identity conformed to the postulates of classic assimilation theory, segmented assimilation theory, or transnational theory, and to assess whether intergroup boundaries were being blurred or brightened. The project design called for recruiting a quota sample of first and second generation immigrants in the urban corridor that stretches from New York City through New Jersey to Philadelphia. Although New York and its suburbs in northern New Jersey are traditional immigrant gateways of long standing, Philadelphia and its suburbs in southern New Jersey only recently began to receive significant migration from Mexico, Central, and South America. Our sampling quotas were defined by the cross-classification of location (Philadelphia, New Jersey, and New York), origin (Caribbean, Mexican, Central American, South American), and generation (first or second), yielding a 3x4x2 social space of 24 cells. Within each cell we sought to compile ten interviews roughly balanced between males and females, for a target of 240 interviews. We recruited young immigrants between the ages of 13 and 35 years, though we did not exclude those who fell outside these bounds.

  • Index of Electoral Malpractice, 1995-2006
    Aim was to investigate electoral malpractice in new and semi-democracies. Studied the mechanics of electoral malpractice and the frequency of different forms of abuse with reference to the strategic constraints under which political actors operate in different contexts. Also explored the causes and consequences of electoral malpractice. Employed a variety of data, including existing datasets and a new dataset created specifically for this research: the Index of Electoral Malpractice, 1995-2006, constructed on the basis of 136 election observation reports produced between 1995 and 2006 by international election observation missions in 57 states in 3 regions of the world, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union and Sub-Saharan Africa. (Free registration is required through the UK Data Archive]

  • Indigenous Peoples and Afro-descendants in Latin America and the Caribbean Data bank - PIAALC
    Contains different subsystems of information that were created on the basis of several projects developed by the Division in recent years. Includes statistics on population, education, health, labor, and migration.

  • Infoninez.mx
    Contains socio-economic indicators for children and adolescents in Mexico.

  • Institutional Influences on Turnout in Mixed Member Electoral Systems 1990-2010
    What institutional factors influence turnout among mixed member electoral systems? This dataset includes institutional factors within mixed systems as well as co-existing electoral structures for mixed legislative elections from 1990-2010 labeled "Free" or "Partially Free" by Freedom House. In addition, this dataset includes 2 separate measures of turnout: registered and voting age population. Includes: Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Lesotho, Lithuania, Macedonia, Mexico, Nepal, New Zealand, Philippines, Russia, Seychelles, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Ukraine, and Venezuela.

  • Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y de Informacion Geografica (INEGI)
    The national statistical agency for Mexico. Provides summary level data and in some cases micro-level data.

  • International Comparative Study on the Management, Productivity, and Effectiveness of Research Teams and Institutions (ICSOPRU), 1971-1989
    Aimed to improve the management of research teams and institutions and increase awareness of their responsibility concerning proper application of research results. Concrete objectives were twofold: (1) on the international level, to make widely available comparable facts and experiences concerning the management of research teams and to promote multilateral as well as bilateral cooperation in this field, and (2) on the national level to provide all those concerned (science policy-makers, research managers, scientists, engineers) with substantive information on the state of their national research potential and to encourage them, on the basis of this information compared eventually with similar information from other countries, to take self-corrective actions as needed to improve the level of effectiveness and productivity of the research teams and institutions. 17 countries from Africa, the Arab States, Asia, Europe and Latin America took part. There were 4 stages or rounds of data collection: 6 countries (Austria, Belgium, Finland, Hungary, Poland, Sweden) in Round 1 (February-September 1974), 6 countries (Argentina, Egypt, India, Republic of Korea [South], Poland, Ukrainian S.S.R.) in Round 2 (June 1978-September 1981), 5 countries (Brazil, India, Nigeria, Spain, Ukrainian S.S.R.) in Round 3 (October 1981-November 1985), and 4 countries (China, Ghana, Hungary, Mexico) in Round 4 (May 1985- June 1987). Each round of questionnaires had different items (except for Rounds 2 and 3 which were the same). Round 1 items included general administrative information relevant to the research units answered by the administrator of the unit, scientific information on the research unit and information relevant to the unit's head answered by the head of the unit, individual information answered by scientists and engineers of the unit, individual information answered by technicians of the unit, and external evaluation of the research units from various scientific and administrative perspectives answered by external evaluators. Rounds 2 and 3 included general information about the research unit answered by the head of the unit, information on the respondent and his or her evaluation of the research unit's management, items on productivity and effectiveness answered by head of the unit along with scientists, engineers, and technicians of the unit, EV-rating of the research unit's effectiveness on a series of dimensions dealing with scientific or social criteria and administrative criteria answered by external evaluators. The 4th round of questionnaires included information on the institutional environment of the research unit answered by the head of the institution, general information on the research unit answered by the head of the unit, information on the respondent and his or her evaluation of the research unit's management, items on productivity and effectiveness answered by the head of the unit, scientists, engineers, and technicians.

  • International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) Series
    Most far-reaching program of standardized sample surveys to look at a householders' experience with crime, policing, crime prevention, and feelings of insecurity in a large number of nations. It also allows for analysis of how risks of crime vary among different groups of populations across social and demographic lines. Also see the ICVS site which also includes the latest rounds.
  • Wave 1 - 1989 - 14 countries
    Wave 2 - 1992 - 12 countries
    Wave 3 - 1996/1997 - 13 countries
    Wave 4 - 2000/2001 - 16 countries
    Wave 5 - 2004/2005 - 30 countries

Sample Size: Generally, 1,000 - 2,000 households from each participating country.

  • International Crisis Behavior Project (1918-2013)
    Consists of 470 crises and 1,036 crisis actors.

  • International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Datasets
    In collaboration with institutions throughout the world, IFPRI is often involved in the collection of primary data and the compilation and processing of secondary data. The resulting datasets provide a wealth of information at the local (household and community), national, and global levels. Includes geospatial data, household and community-level surveys, institution-level surveys, regional data, and social accounting matrices.

  • International Religious Freedom Data (2001, 2003, 2005, 2008)
    Contains aggregate measures from U.S. State Department's International Religious Freedom Reports. This coding produced data on 196 different countries and territories but excluded the United States. Also includes 3 indexes calculated from these data: Government Regulation of Religion index, Social Regulation of Religion index, Government Favoritism of Religion index. Part of the Association of Religion Data Archives. 2008 is found separately.

  • International Social Survey Program (ISSP) (1985+)
    For the latest see the site's web page. A listing of modules performed as well as plans through 2020 is available (including questionnaires for not-yet-released years). Ongoing program of crossnational collaboration. Develops topical modules dealing with important areas of social science as supplements to regular national surveys. Every survey includes questions about general attitudes toward various social issues such as the legal system, sex, and the economy. Special topics have included the environment, the role of government, social inequality, social support, family and gender issues, work orientation, the impact of religious background, behavior, and beliefs on social and political preferences, and national identity. Participating countries vary for each topical module. Registration is required. 1998-2007 is also available in an easy to use comparative program.

  • Interviews with Low-Income Mexican Women Household Heads in Urban Mexico (September 1992-March 1994)
    Explores the impact on the welfare of families of women's household headship in low-income Mexican urban neighborhoods. For this study, personal interviews were conducted with women in Guadalajara and Veracruz, Mexico. Respondents discussed many aspects of their daily lives, including how much they earned per week and what jobs they had held. In addition, they discussed their families, including their husbands and children, and their current housing situation. Other background information was collected on income, the number of years of education attained, political activity, and the health status of the respondents and their families.

  • IPUMS - Migration Records
    Some IPUMS samples include separate data files documenting migration events in the period prior to the census. These data do not fit within the data structure of the IPUMS extracts, because they can include multiple observations per household or per woman. Researchers must download the files and link them to data from the IPUMS extract system.

    Migration samples are currently available for Brazil (2010), Ecuador (2001, 2010), El Salvador (2007), Malawi (2008), Mexico (2000, 2010), Nepal (2001), Saint Lucia (1991), and Senegal (2002).

    Several IPUMS samples have comparable data organized as a series of variables on the household record. These unharmonized variables can be accessed through the data extract system: Migration - Jamaica (1991), Panama (1990, 2000, 2010). Registration is required.

  • IPUMS-International Census Data
    Project dedicated to collecting and distributing census data from around the world. Samples are currently available for Argentina (1970, 1980, 1991, 2001, 2010), Armenia (2001, 2011), Austria (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Bangladesh (1991, 2001, 2011), Belarus (1999, 2009), Bolivia (1976, 1992, 2001), Botswana (1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Brazil (1960, 1970, 1980, 1991, 2000, 2010), Burkina Faso (1985, 1996, 2006), Cambodia (1998, 2008), Cameroon (1976, 1987, 2005), Canada (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Chile (1960, 1970, 1982, 1992, 2002), China (1982, 1990, 2000), Colombia (1964, 1973, 1985, 1993, 2005), Costa Rica (1963, 1973, 1984, 2000, 2011), Cuba (2002), Dominican Republic (1960, 1970, 1981, 2002, 2010), Ecuador (1962, 1974, 1982, 1990, 2001, 2010), Egypt (1986, 1996, 2006), El Salvador (1992, 2007), Ethiopia [1984, 1994, 2007], Fiji (1966, 1976, 1986, 1996, 2007), France (1962, 1968, 1975, 1982, 1990, 1999, 2006, 2011), West Germany (1970, 1987), East Germany (1971, 1981) Ghana (1984, 2000, 2010), Greece (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Guinea (1983, 1996), Haiti (1971, 1982, 2003), Hungary (1970, 1980, 1990, 2001, 2011, India (1983, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009 -- all employment surveys), Indonesia (1971, 1976, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000, 2005, 2010), Iran (2006, 2011), Iraq (1997), Ireland (1971, 1979, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2002, 2006, 2011), Israel (1972, 1983, 1995), Italy (2001), Jamaica (1982, 1991, 2001), Jordan (2004), Kenya (1969, 1979, 1989, 1999, 2009), Kyrgyz Republic (1999, 2009), Liberia (1974, 2008), Malawi (1987, 1998, 2008), Malaysia (1970, 1980, 1991, 2000), Mali (1987, 1998, 2009), Mexico (1960, 1970, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015), (Mongolia 1989, 2000), Morocco (1982, 1994, 2004), Mozambique [1997, 2007], Nepal (2001), Netherlands (1960, 1971, 2001), Nicaragua (1971, 1995, 2005), Nigeria (2006-2010), Pakistan (1973, 1981, 1998), Palestine (1997, 2007), Panama (1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010), Paraguay [1962, 1972, 1982, 1992, 2002], Peru (1993, 2007), Philippines (1990, 1995, 2000), Poland (1978, 1988, 2002, 2011), Portugal (1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), Puerto Rico (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2005, 2010), Romania (1977, 1992, 2002, 2011), Rwanda (1991, 2002), Saint Lucia (1980, 1991), Senegal (1988, 2002), Sierra Leone (2004), Slovenia (2002), South Africa (1996, 2001, 2007, 2011), Spain (1981, 1991, 2001, 2011), South Sudan (2008), Sudan (2008), Switzerland (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000), Tanzania (1988, 2002, 2012), Thailand (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000), Trinidad and Tobago (1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2011), Turkey (1985, 1990, 2000), Uganda (1991, 2001), Ukraine (2001), United Kingdom (1991, 2001), United States (1850+), Uruguay (1963, 1975, 1985, 1996, 2006, 2011), Venezuela (1971, 1981, 1990, 2001), Vietnam (1989, 1999, 2009), Zambia (1990, 2000, 2010). Registration is required.

  • Job Flows Dataset (1978-2001)
    Contains information on job flows for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Uruguay.

  • Judicial en materia penal (1997+)
    Administrative crime data for Mexico.

  • KAPS: Family Planning Studies (Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices studies)
    In the 1960s and 70s, the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices studies surveyed women and men across the world about family planning, birth control, pregnancy, and sex. The majority of the samples are of women under the age of 50, married women, and women living in cities and metropolitan areas. The featured countries are Mexico, the United States, Israel, the Philippines, France, Brazil, Ecuador, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Argentina, Colombia, Panama, Venezuela, and Peru. What is the ideal family size? What is the impact of the population growth rate, will it cause societal problems? What methods of birth control are used the most frequently? Is it even acceptable to use birth control at all? What are the reasons people have children? Personal questions about fertility, conception, sterility, abortion, and unwanted pregnancies are also addressed. In addition to family planning, the KAPS studies also feature gender and societal topics. What kind of education would you want for your daughter? What are the appropriate roles for women? How often does your husband help with housework? Should married women work outside the home?

  • Land Reform in Mexico 1910-1976

  • LAPOP - Latin American Public Opinion Project
    Surveys analyzing citizen views on system support, political tolerance, citizen participation, local government, corruption, and views on authoritarianism for Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Venezuela as well as for Albania, Israel, and Madagascar.

  • Latin America elite poll II
    537 elites were interviewed in face-to-face meetings between August 20 and October 2, 2003. Interviews were conducted in six Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela. A near-equal portion of each of the following sectors was targeted: government, media, academia, and business. For the purposes of the survey, elites are defined as high/middle-high income respondents with special knowledge of their area of interest.

  • Latin American Databank at Roper
    Public opinion surveys conducted by the survey research community in Latin America, including universities, institutes, individual scholars, private polling and public opinion research firms. To date, the collection holds nearly 1,200 studies from 16 countries, with the largest contributions coming from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela.

    Princeton has a subscription to the Roper Center. To access a study from this archive that is not online, identify it in their catalog and then send a request to a data@princeton.edu and supply the title and study number.

  • Latin American Electronic Data Archive. Latin American Electoral Data.
    Links to sources of Latin American electoral data.

  • Latin American Migration Project (LAMP)
    Born as an extension of the Mexican Migration Project (MMP), which was created in 1982 by an interdisciplinary team of researchers to advance our understanding of the complex processes of international migration and immigration to the United States. Data from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Peru, Haiti and Colombia are available, and can be downloaded from this website.

  • Latin American Mortality Database (LAMBdA)
    Supports the study of very recent mortality trends and is particularly suited for the study of old age mortality during the post-WWII period. Covers the interval between 1848 and 2014. Includes population censuses, age-specific (five year and single year age groups) total death counts (starting in 1900), and by causes of deaths (starting in 1945). Free registration is required.

  • Latinobarometro (1995+)
    Summary level public opinion data for Latin America and Spain. Microdata is also available through 2015 in Stata format. Note: A survey was not conducted in 1999 or 2014.

  • Learning Democracy in Mexico and the United States, 2000
    This survey was done in Mexico and the US and includes knowledge of and attitudes about democracy from understanding what it is, expectations about it, satisfaction with the way it works in their country, memberships in organizations, participation in politics, attitudes about politics and government, and confidence in institutions.

  • Levels of Democracy and Democratic Institutionalization in 18 Latin American Countries, 1978-2004
    analyzed the level of democracy achieved by 18 Latin American countries after 1977, between the transitions from authoritarian rule and 2004. Despite authoritarian interruptions in the past, one of the best predictors of the current level of democracy is the country's experience with competitive politics before 1978. Created original indicators to show that democratic trajectories are institutionalized through political parties and judicial institutions, and we documented the impact of regime legacies using a hybrid fixed-effects model.

  • Luxembourg Income Studies (LIS)
    Household income surveys involving 43 countries. Also available are the Luxembourg Employment Study, a database containing data on labor force characteristics for 16 countries (ceased in 2000 and incorporated into LIS), and the Luxembourg Wealth Study, a database containing data on household wealth in 12 countries. Users must register to gain access, but registration is free for academic use. For variables in the LIS and LWS over time see their web sites.

  • Major Episodes of Political Violence, 1946-2016
    Annual, cross-national, time-series data on interstate, societal, and communal warfare magnitude scores (independence, interstate, ethnic, and civil; violence and warfare); also, scores for neighboring countries and regional context

  • Manifesto Project Database
    Deals with different aspects of political party performance as well as the structure and development of party systems. Based on quantitative content analyses of parties' election programs from more than 50 countries covering all free, democratic elections since 1945.

  • Manpower Employment Outlook Survey (1st Quarter 2007+)
    Indicator of hiring activity for the next quarter. The forecast includes responses from over 65,000 employers in 42 countries and covers the world's major labor markets.

  • Mathematics Teaching in the 21st Century (2006)
    Cross-national study of the preparation of middle school mathematics teachers. Countries participating included Chinese Taipei (Taiwan), South Korea (Korea), Bulgaria, Germany, Mexico, and the United States. Data were collected from teachers in their first and last year of preparation by sampling institutions in each country. Future teachers were asked about their backgrounds, course-taking and program activities, knowledge relevant to their teaching (mathematical and pedagogical), and beliefs and perspectives on content and pedagogy.

  • Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures
    Contains 69 new indices for race, ethnicity, language, religion, income, and geography.

  • Measuring Brain Drain by Gender 1990-2000
    Emigration stocks and rates are provided by level of schooling and gender for 195 source countries in 1990 and 2000.

  • Mexican American People: A Generation Later
    In an original study conducted in 1965, Leo Grebler, Joan Moore, and Ralph Guzman surveyed Mexican Americans in San Antonio, Texas, and Los Angeles, California. The 1st survey provided a rich cross-sectional view of this population's demographics and attitudes, Ortiz and Telles' 35 year follow-up now allows for a longitudinal view of the behavior and ethnic identification of 1st- through 4th-generation Mexican Americans in these areas. The new survey was used to test hypotheses related to Mexican Americans' social mobility, their ethnic identity and behavior, their experiences with discrimination, and the relationship between socioeconomic status and ethnic identity. Data includes birth dates, citizenship information, education, income, housing, language, medical, religious affiliations, immediate and extended family demographic information, and self perception in regards to ethnicity.

  • Mexican American Study Project
    Longitudinal and intergenerational data set that is representative of Mexican Americans living in San Antonio City and Los Angeles County in 1965. Consists of 3 parts; the original survey in 65-66, a follow up interview of the original respondents under age 50 completed in 1998-2002 and a sample of their children, also done in 98-02. The data are linked by family where there is 1 original respondent and 0-2 children in each family. Follow up to The Mexican American Study Project, 1965-1966.

    Sample Size: 684 original respondents and 758 children.

  • Mexican Election Panel Study (2000)
    Assessed campaign influences on public opinion and voting behavior in Mexico's July 2, 2000, presidential election.

  • Mexican Family Life Survey
    On-going nationally representative longitudinal survey of individuals, households, families and communities. The first wave was conducted in 2002. The 2nd wave was conducted in 2005-2006. Follow-ups were conducted in 2009 and 2012. The data from the first 3 waves have been released. The baseline covers over 8,400 households in 150 communities across Mexico.

  • Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS)
    Prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico, with national and urban/rural representation. The baseline survey was conducted in the Summer of 2001, and a follow-up is planned for the Spring-Summer of 2003. Collaborative effort among researchers from the Universities of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Wisconsin in the U.S., and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, Geografia e Informatica (INEGI) in Mexico. Data is available for 2001 and 2003.

  • Mexican Migration Project. (MMP) 1982+
    Main focus is to gather social as well as economic information on Mexican-US migration. Has 154 communities in 24 states. Each year, during the winter months (when seasonal migrants tend to return home), households in communities located throughout Mexico are randomly sampled. After gathering social, demographic, and economic information on the household and its members, interviewers collect basic immigration information on each person's first and last trip to the United States. From household heads and spouses, detailed year-by-year labor history and migration information is compiled; in addition, for household head migrants, a detailed series of questions about their last trip to the U.S. is administered, focusing on employment, earnings, and use of U.S. social services. Information on 24,701 Mexican households, 957 U.S. households, and individual-level data on 162,293 persons. Contains information on 8,252 household heads with migration experience to the U.S. and information on 51 household heads with Canadian migration experience.

  • Mexican Origin People in the United States: the 1979 Chicano Survey
    Household survey of persons of Mexican descent living in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, and Chicago, Illinois. The purpose was to compile a statistically representative and comprehensive body of empirical information about the social, economic, and psychological status of Chicanos. Major topics covered were mental and physical health and use of health services, family background and composition, customary practices and values, language use and attitudes, employment history, social identity, group consciousness, and political opinions and participation.

    Sample Size: Of over 11,000 people screened, 1,400 met the Mexican ancestry criterion. Of this total, 991 interviews were collected.

  • Mexico - Early Childhood Education Program Impact Evaluation 2012-2014
    Measured the impact of the Mexico's Early Childhood Education Program on the physical, cognitive and social development of children as well as changes in parents' and caregivers' habits and reading practices. The Early Childhood Education Program (ECEP), also known as Educacion Inicial, is being implemented by Educational Promotion National Council (CONAFE) in highly marginalized rural areas of Mexico. It consists of a non-formal education program that provides training to community workers and families for the upbringing of children from 0-4 years of age, as well as care during pregnancy.

  • Mexico - Impact Evaluation of a Low Cost Private School Model 2013, Baseline Survey

  • Mexico - Impact Evaluation of Parental Empowerment Program 2007, Baseline Survey

  • Mexico - Impact Evaluation of Parental Empowerment Program 2008, First Follow-up Survey

  • Mexico - Impact Evaluation of Parental Empowerment Program 2009, Second Follow-up Survey

  • Mexico - Impact Evaluation of Parental Empowerment Program 2010, Endline Survey
    Designed to examine the influence of increased funding for the parental participation program on learning outcomes, parent and teacher involvement, as well as dropout and failure rates. The parental participation program, also known as Apoyo a la Gestion Escolar (AGEs), or Support to School Management, is part of a larger Compensatory Education Project that is being implemented in the most marginalized municipalities of Mexico. AGEs component was altered to provide additional resources to 125 participating schools. The AGEs financial support consists of quarterly transfers to Parent Associations' school accounts, averaging $600 per year depending on a school size. Participating schools received double the usual amount. The baseline survey was conducted in October-November 2007, the first follow-up assessment took place in June-December 2008, the second follow-up in January-February 2010, and the endline survey was carried out in May-June 2010.

  • Mexico census 1990 (Census tract level data (AGEB 1990) and Locality level data (ITER 1990))
    Summary data at the tract and locality level for Mexico in 1990.

  • Mexico Panel Study, 2012
    The Mexico 2012 Panel Study is a 2-wave, major survey research project on Mexico's 2012 general election campaign with a focus on vote buying and the impact of crime and violence on vote choices. It is roughly comparable in scope to the American National Election Studies and the British Elections Studies. Similar to the Mexico 2000 and Mexico 2006 Panel Studies, it is intended to be a resource for scholars working on campaigns, public opinion, voting behavior, and political communication, whether they focus on Mexico or not. Examines democratic consolidation in Mexico through the lens of electoral politics and documents how the mass public, the candidates, the political parties, and the media interact to shape the subjects of electoral contests - taking into account the possibility that political elites may anticipate the preferences of ordinary citizens and of other elites. Goal was to understand why electoral campaigns highlight or downplay certain issues, and to assess the implications of these dynamics for democratic governance. Some of the questions in this study include "Who sets the agenda in Mexican elections?", "To what extent does this agenda respond to, engage, or ignore ordinary citizens?", and "What do the dynamics of 'issue emergence' mean for democratic representation?". Demographic variables include, age, sex, civil/marital status, education, income, occupation, social class, and religion.

  • Mexico: Evaluation of PROGRESA, 1997-1999
    In 1997, the federal government of Mexico introduced the Programa de Educacion, Salud y Alimentacion (the Education, Health, and Nutrition Program), known by its Spanish acronym, PROGRESA, as part of its renewed effort to break the intergenerational transmission of poverty. The sample consists of panel data collected for 24,000 households from 506 localities in the seven states of Guerrero, Hidalgo, Michoacan, Puebla, Queretaro, San Luis Potosi and Veracruz. Data must be requested from the site.

  • Microfinance Revolution: An Overview
    Microfinance in Bangladesh, Bolivia, Mexico, and the United States.

  • Migration and Remittances Factbook

  • Minorities at Risk (MAR) Project (1945+)
    Tracks 282 politically-active ethnic groups throughout the world -- identifying where they are, what they do, and what happens to them. Focuses specifically on ethnopolitical groups, non-state communal groups that have "political significance" in the contemporary world because of their status and political actions. Political significance is determined by: (1) The group collectively suffers, or benefits from, systematic discriminatory treatment compared to other groups in a society and (2) The group is the basis for political mobilization and collective action in defense or promotion of its self-defined interests.

  • Montevideo-Oxford Latin American Economic History Database
    Economic and social indicators covering 20 Latin American countries for 1900-2010.

  • National Exit Poll for the 2006 Mexican Presidential Election
    Conducted by the Reforma newspaper for the coverage of the 2006 Mexican Presidential election. Respondents were asked how they voted for President, Senator, and Federal Deputy (Lower House of Congress). They were also asked about their interest in the campaigns, their opinion of all 5 presidential candidates, reasons for supporting their preferred candidate, and when they decided his/her vote choice. Respondents were queried on their approval of President Vincente Fox and asked to provide economic retrospective evaluations on both the personal and national level. Demographic variables include sex, age, education level, occupation, household income, religious denomination, frequency of church attendance, membership to labor unions, party identification, left-right self-placement, voter preference in the 2000 presidential and in the 2003 mid-term legislative elections, and whether they are beneficiaries of social programs against poverty.

    Sample Size: Used a multi-stage probability sample of precincts previously stratified by urban-rural criteria. 5,803 respondents were selected in a systematic manner throughout the day, using 3 different schedules.

  • National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Elderly Population
    Examines the responses of 761 individuals among the elderly population in Mexico. These individuals were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; how they feel society generally treats them; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their age; what action should be taken to prevent elderly discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination towards the elderly population; the life opportunities of the elderly; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination towards the elderly has changed over the years.

  • National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Religious Minorities
    Examines the responses of 789 individuals with non-Catholic religious beliefs in Mexico. These religious minorities were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their religious beliefs; whether or not Catholics have more privileges in society; what action should be taken to prevent religious discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination toward religious minorities; the life opportunities of religious minorities; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination toward religious minorities has changed over the years.

  • North American Transportation Statistics Database
    Transportation data on Canada, Mexico, and the United States.

  • Occupational Wages around the World (OWW) Database
    Contains occupational wage data for 161 occupations in 171 countries from 1983 to 2008.

  • OECD Health Data
    Examines national health systems from 1960 forward for OECD member countries and select non-OECD countries in a general, demographic, economic, and social context.

  • Perceptions of Electoral Integrity
    A new expert survey of Perceptions of Electoral Integrity designed to provide a comprehensive, impartial, and independent source of information about whether national elections meet internationally-recognized standards.

  • Pew Global Attitudes Project
    Worldwide public opinion surveys that encompasses a broad array of subjects ranging from people's assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day. Topics have included views of Asian nations of each other, Muslims in Europe, images of the United States, the Iraq War, and foreign policy. Surveys include different nations and topics by year.

  • Pew Hispanic Center Survey of Mexicans Living in the U.S. on Absentee Voting in Mexican Elections
    Interviews were conducted from January 16 - February 6, 2006 among a representative sample of 987 Mexican respondents age 18 and older. A total of 62 are registered to vote and 922 are not registered to vote.

  • Political Business Cycles in Open Economies in 28 Developing Countries From Latin America, Asia, and Africa, 1976-2002
    Looked at whether opportunistic and partisan business cycles influence fiscal policy in 28 developing countries when controlling for de facto exchange rate regimes and capital mobility. Several issues were investigated: 1) opportunistic business cycles, whether elections cause the governments budget balance (taxes minus spending) to experience fiscal expansion (lower taxes and higher spending) in order to stimulate the economy; 2) partisan business cycles, whether left-wing parties engage in more fiscal expansion; 3) whether growing capital mobility (the ability of financial capital to move across borders) will encourage or inhibit a government's ability to engage in fiscal expansion with an impending election or left-wing party; and 4) whether the exchange rate regime (the rules for determining the exchange rate) is a mitigating factor.

  • Political Elites in Mexico, 1900-1971
    Contains information on the political office holder's sex, birthplace, profession/occupations, military service, date and place of birth and death, father's occupation, education (preparation, length, attainment, specialization, foreign training), travel abroad, intellectual activities (publications, teaching), political affiliation, political offices held and length of stay, activity during the revolution of 1910-1920, geographical entity represented, memberships in political and other organizations. Requires free registration. Courtesy of University of Wisconsin.

  • Political Events Project, 1948-1965
    Contains data on 6,754 political instability events in 84 selected nations in the period 1948-1965. These data, which permit measurement of political instability and the correlates of internal conflict behavior, are concerned with conflict directed by groups and individuals in the prevailing political system against other groups or persons, and with uncovering the determinants of stability within all national political systems. The variables in the dataset are divided into four basic types: variables that identify events, classify events, describe events, and evaluate events. The study provides a conflict intensity rating for each event. Political instability events are classified from low to high and include institutionally prescribed elections, the fall of cabinets, martial laws, assassinations of significant group leaders, mass arrests, coup d'etats, and civil wars.

  • Politico-Religious Organization and Economic Change in Zinacantan, Mexico, 1952-1987
    Stems from anthropological field work on politico-religious organization and economic change in Zinacantan, Mexico. Major areas of investigation include local economics, economic stratification, and political and religious organization. Men of Zinacantan, Mexico, held year-long religious posts called ''cargos,'' and waiting lists were kept to record the names of men who wished to serve in the future. The cargo data presented in this collection include information on cargo waiting lists such as the year in which the lists were used, the cargo requested, and the hamlet of residence of the requester. The census data for the hamlet Nachig for the years 1967, 1983, and 1987 include information such as age, residence, tax-paying status, land holdings, wealth, economic activity, economic status, political affiliation, and religious and civil offices held. The unit of analysis for the cargo data is the cargo requested. For the census data, the unit of analysis is married men.

  • Politics and the Migrant Poor in Mexico City, 1970-1972
    Comparative study of male migrants and their city-born neighbors living in 6 relatively small, predominately low-income communities on the periphery of Mexico City. Dealt with a relatively small group of people in a limited number of localities at a particular point in time. The research addressed several broad theoretical and empirical problems such as the most important incentives and disincentives for political involvement, the effect a large group of people entering the political arena has on the functioning of the political system, how the individual citizen -- and especially the disadvantaged citizen -- can manipulate the political system to satisfy their needs, the process by which individuals form images of politics and the political system, the process by which individuals assume a role of participation or non-participation in political activity, what occurs at the "grass roots" of a nation's political system, and how political activity at that level affects system outputs. Attempted to place the low-income migrant in a social and political context, and focused on the nature and frequency of interactions between the research communities and external actors, especially political and government officials. Demographic variables include age, race, socio-economic status, marital status, dwelling unit type, and religious preference.

  • Polity IV: Political Regime Characteristics and Transitions, 1800-2016
    Contains information on and access to the most recent update of the well-known and highly respected Polity data series, originally designed by Ted Robert Gurr. Polity IV contains coded annual information on regime and authority characteristics for all independent states (with greater than 500,000 total population) in the global state system.

  • Polling the Nations
    Compilation of public opinion surveys conducted in the United States and more than 100 other countries. Each record includes the question asked and the responses given, the polling organization responsible for the work, the date the information was released, the sample size, and the groups or areas included in the interview.

  • Population Exposure Estimates in Proximity to Nuclear Power Plants, Locations
    Provides a global data set of point locations and attributes describing nuclear power plants and reactors.

  • Project on Ethnicity and Race in Latin America (PERLA)
    Goal is to empirically examine numerous dimensions of race and ethnicity across Latin America. Includes in-depth ethnicity and race surveys in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.

  • RAND Database of Worldwide Terrorism Incidents
    Records terrorist incidents that occurred from 1968-2009. Free registration is required.

  • Regional Core Health Data Initiative (Pan American Health Organization)
    Multidimensional query tool that offers a collection of 108 indicators for 48 states and territories of the Americas from 1995 to 2007 as well as Canada and the United States. The system presents data and indicators on: demography; socioeconomics; mortality by cause indicators; morbidity and risk factors; and access, resources and health services coverage. Selected indicators are disaggregated into age groups, sex and/or urban/rural region.

  • Religion and State Constitutions, 1990-2002
    Set of measures that systematically gauge the intersection between government and religion. Examines constitutional clauses that address religion for 169 states on a yearly basis between 1990 and 2002. This constitutes all countries with populations of 250,000 or more, as well as a sampling of smaller states.

  • Research on Early Life and Aging Trends and Effects (RELATE): A Cross-National Study (1996--2008)
    Compiles cross-national data that contain information that can be used to examine the effects of early life conditions on older adult health conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, obesity, functionality, mortality, and self-reported health. The complete cross sectional/longitudinal dataset (n=147,278) was compiled from major studies of older adults or households across the world that in most instances are representative of the older adult population either nationally, in major urban centers, or in provinces. It includes over 180 variables with information on demographic and geographic variables along with information about early life conditions and life course events for older adults in low, middle and high income countries. Selected variables were harmonized to facilitate cross national comparisons.

  • SABE - Survey on Health, Well-Being, and Aging in Latin America and the Caribbean (2000)
    Examined health conditions and functional limitations of persons aged 60 and older in the countries of Argentina, Barbados, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay, with special focus on persons over 80 years of age.

  • SCINCE : Sistema para la consulta de informacion censal 2000, Distrito Federal : XII Censo General de Poblacion y Vivienda 2000
    Population and housing statistics on the states of Mexico from its 2000 Census. Princeton also has the edition covering 1990.

  • Seguridad Publica en Mexico (Public Security in Mexico)
    Crime statistics by state in Mexico for 1997-2014.

  • SIPRI's databases (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute)
    Includes databases including statistics on securty trends, multilateral peace operations, military expenditures, arms transfers, arms embargoes, and arms exports.

  • Social Conflict Analysis Database (SCAD)
    Includes protests, riots, strikes, inter-communal conflict, government violence against civilians, and other forms of social conflict not systematically tracked in other conflict datasets. SCAD currently includes information on social conflicts from 1990-2014, covering all of Africa and now also Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.

  • Socio-Economic Database for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEDLAS and The World Bank)
    Includes statistics on poverty and other distributional and social variables from 25 Latin American and Caribbean countries, based on microdata from households surveys. Some data is subnational.

  • State Fragility Index and Matrix, Time-Series Data, 1995-2016
    Provides annual state fragility, effectiveness, and legitimacy indices and the 8 component indicators for the world's 167 countries with populations greater than 500,000 in 2016.

  • Statistical Abstracts of the World (ProQuest)
    For a select list of countries, contains recent yearbooks. Tables are available in Excel format and have been converted to English.

  • Survey of Mexican Migrants
    The Pew Hispanic Center conducted an unprecedented survey of Mexican migrants in the United States, including thousands who say they have no U.S.-issued identity documents. Provides detailed information on the demographic characteristics, living arrangements, work experiences and attitudes toward immigration of 4,836 Mexican adults who completed a 12-page questionnaire as they were applying for a matricula consular, an identity document issued by Mexican diplomatic missions. Fieldwork was conducted in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, Raleigh, NC, and Fresno, CA, from July 12, 2004, to Jan. 28, 2005.

  • Terra Populus: Integrated Data on Population and Environment
    Integrates the world's population and environmental data, including population censuses and surveys; land cover information from remote sensing; climate records from weather stations; and land use records from statistical agencies. Currently includes over 80 countries.

  • Third International Mathematics and Science Study: International Curriculum Analysis, 1992-1995 (TIMSS)
    Provided curricular and textbook information from each country participating. Comparative study of education in mathematics and the sciences conducted in over 40 countries on 5 continents. The goal was to measure student achievement in mathematics and science in participating countries and to assess some of the curricular and classroom factors that are related to student learning in these subjects.

  • Transnational Social Movement Organization Dataset, 1953-2003
    Brings new data to the investigation of relationships between globalization, social movements, and political change. Aims to enhance understanding of the organizational foundations for transnational activism, namely the population of transnational social movement organizations. Contains 301 variables. The variables were either taken directly from the Yearbook of International Organizations, or created from information in the Yearbook.

  • United Nations Surveys of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems
    Collects data on the incidence of reported crime and the operations of criminal justice systems with a view to improving the analysis and dissemination of that information globally. Results provide an overview of trends and interrelationships between various parts of the criminal justice system to promote informed decision-making in administration, nationally and internationally. The surveys were started in 1977, covering 5-year intervals from 1970-1994. Starting in 1995 surveys cover 2 or 3 year intervals. Data may also be accessed through ICPSR.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Mexico, 1962
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • Voice of the People Series (2005+)
    Annual survey to solicit public opinion on social and political issues. Every year the survey will be conducted in approximately 50 countries, with a minimal sample size of 500 per country. Wherever possible, within each country a nationally representative sample n=500 adults, male and female, aged 18 and older will be used. In some emergent countries, where such research conditions are not possible, there may be stated variations to this (e.g. urban areas only). Similarly, in the developed world interviews will be conducted by telephone, while in emergent and under-developed countries face to face interviews will be conducted. Demographic variables include sex, age, household income, education level, employment status, and religious preference.

  • WHO Mortality Database
    World Health Organization compilation of mortality data by age, sex and cause of death, as reported annually by member states from their civil registration systems.

  • Women in Development Series (1979-1980, 1983)
    Series of studies on women in development in 1970 with data drawn primarily from national censuses, surveys, statistical abstracts, and international statistical compendia. References are also made in some cases to evaluative studies conducted by individual researchers, research teams, and the staff of the International Demographic Data Center of the Bureau. These data constitute the most recently available information at the time of collection. The aim of this data series was to provide a reliable, up-to-date, accessible database on women in development which can illuminate the discrepancies in the roles and status of women against those of men throughout the world in order to serve as a basis for the promotion of both intranational and international parity between the sexes. The studies that comprise the Women in Development series consist of national-level data concerning female/male differentials over a range of demographic and socio-economic variables. Wherever possible, the data are broken down by age and urban/rural residence to facilitate further analysis. The series is cumulative and the data are presented in basic tabular format. Initially, the data tables were compiled for 69 developing nations from Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Near East that were recipients of the United States Agency for International Development aid. The first collection, Women in Development, 1979-1980 (ICPSR 8053), included all the aid-recipient nations regardless of population size. Subsequently, data were compiled for all remaining nations of the world with a population of five million or more, and statistics for the original nations were updated to reflect more recent information. The second collection in the series, Women in Development IV, 1983 (ICPSR 8155), covered approximately 120 nations from Asia, the Pacific, Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Near East, North America, Europe, and the Soviet Union.

  • Women in National Parliaments (1997+)
    World and regional averages of the percentage of women in national parliaments.

  • Women in Parliament, 1945-2003: Cross-National Dataset
    Information on women's inclusion in parliamentary bodies in over 150 countries from 1945 to 2003. Allows for extensive, large-scale, cross-national investigation of the factors that explain women's attainment of political power over time and provides educators with comprehensive international and historical information on women in a variety of political positions. Information is provided on female suffrage, the first female member of parliament, yearly percentages of women in parliaments, when women reached important representational milestones, such as 10 %, 20 %, and 30 % of a legislature, and when women achieved highly-visible political positions, such as prime minister, president, or head of parliament.

  • World Bank Group Country Opinion Survey Program (COS)
    Interested in gauging the views of clients and partners who are either involved in development in the given country or who observe activities related to social and economic development. Meant to give the World Bank's team that works in the given country, more in-depth insight into how the Bank's work is perceived.

  • World Bank Microdata Library
    Portal for all surveys and datasets held in catalogs maintained by the World Bank and a number of contributing external catalogs.

  • World Contraceptive Use (2010, 2012, 2016)
    Includes trends on contraceptive prevalence and unmet needs for family planning. 2012 and 2016 can also be found on the UN Site..

  • World Database of Happiness: States of Nations
    Includes summary information from social surveys indicating levels of happiness in about 95 countries around the world, along with data on possible causal factors. Includes state level measures for the USA.

  • World Development Indicators
    Development indicators from the World Bank. Covers population, education, health, aid, poverty and environmental indicators for 217 countries.

  • World Fertility Data (2006, 2008, 2012, 2015)
    Presents data on age-specific fertility rates, total fertility and mean age at childbearing for 201 countries or areas of the world. Covers the time period from 1950 to the present. Data for the time period before 1950 have been included as well, if readily available, but no systematic attempt was made to collect data prior to 1950 for all countries. 2015 is also found on the UN site.

  • World Fertility Survey
    Series of fertility surveys from 1974-1982 that covered various countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Portugal.

  • World Handbook of Aging and Social Security Indicators (1950-1980)
    Contains 184 variables prepared by the authors in connection with their comparative study of government support of the aged. The data is focused on indicators relevant to social security (social welfare) programs and to the health and welfare of the aged. Some variables have data on up to 131 nations, although most variables have data on fewer nations, as only a limited number of nations have social security data available.

  • World Health Survey (WHS) (2002-2004)
    Monitors critical health outcomes and health systems through the fielding of a valid, reliable, and comparable household survey instrument. The WHS was implemented between 2002 and 2004 in countries selected to represent all regions of the world. Study samples were nationally representative and probabilistically selected. Sampling weights were generated and adjusted for the population distribution with final post-stratification corrections for non-response. The total sample size, using nationally representative samples, includes over 300,000 individuals aged 18+ years. For China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, WHS also serves as SAGE Wave 0. Household data includes a household roster, health insurance coverage, health expenditures, and indicators of permanent income or wealth. Individual level data include sociodemographic information, health state descriptions, health state valuation, risk factors, chronic conditions, mortality, health care utilization, health systems responsiveness and social capital. Registration is required. Each nation was surveyed once during this period. ICPSR has Waves 0 and 1 only. Countries covered: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain. Bangladesh, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Canada, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo Republic, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyz Republic. Lao PDR, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Senegal, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

  • World Income Inequality Database
    The UNU/WIDER World Income Inequality Database (WIID) collects and stores information on income inequality for developed, developing, and transition countries.

  • World Marriage Data (2006, 2008, 2012, 2015)
    Provides comparable data on the marital status of the population by age and sex for 231 countries or areas of the world. Contains data on marital status of men and women, currently married men and women, ever married men and women and singulate mean age at marriage (SMAM). Data are presented from around 1970 to the most recent data available. 2015 is also found on the UN site.

  • World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers [Trade] Series (1961-1993)
    Worldwide and regional annual totals of military spending.

  • World Mortality Report (2011)
    Includes death rates, infant mortality, under age 5 mortality, life expectancy, and probability of dying between ages 15 and 60. Some data goes back to 1950 with projections to 2015.

  • World Population Prospects
    Comprehensive set of demographic indicators for 1950-2100. Includes measures of fertility, life expectancy, migration, and measures of the impact of HIV/AIDS. Older versions are on the DSS server.

  • World Public Opinion.org
    Program on International Policy Attitudes site providing public opinion from around the world.

  • World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators Database (2016 ed.)
    Contains time series data for 1960, 1965, 1970 and annually from 1975-2015 for around 180 different telecommunication and ICT statistics covering the telecommunication network and ICT uptake, mobile services, quality of service, traffic, staff, tariffs, revenue and investment. Data for over 200 economies are available. For select series more recent data may be available on the ITU website. Also see ITU Historical Statistics with select data from 1849-1967.

  • World Values Survey (WVS)
    Designed to enable a crossnational comparison of values and norms on a wide variety of topics and to monitor changes in values and attitudes across the globe. A variety of questions on religion and morality were included. Coverage includes: Albania - 1998, 2002; Algeria - 2002, 2014; Andorra - 2005; Argentina - 1991, 1995, 1999, 2006, 2013; Armenia - 1997, 2011; Australia - 1995, 2005, 2012; Austria - 1990, 1999; Azerbaijan - 1997, 2011-2012; Bahrain (2014); Bangladesh - 1996, 2002; Belarus - 1996, 2000, 2011; Belgium - 1981, 1990, 1999; Bosnia and Herzegovinia - 1998, 2001; Brazil - 1990, 1997, 2006, 2014; Bulgaria - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2006; Burkina Faso - 2007; Canada - 1982, 1990, 2000, 2006; Chile - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2006; China - 1990, 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Colombia - 1998, 2005, 2012; Croatia - 1996, 1999; Cyprus - 2006, 2011; Czech Republic - 1991, 1998, 1999; Denmark - 1981, 1990, 1999; Dominican Republic - 1998; Ecuador - 2013; Egypt - 2000, 2008, 2012; El Salvador - 1999; Estonia - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2011; Ethiopia - 2007; Finland - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005; France - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006; Georgia - 1996, 2008, 2014; Germany - 2006, 2013; Germany East - 1990, 1997; Germany West - 1981, 1990, 1997; Ghana - 2007, 2011; Great Britain - 1981, 1990, 1998, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Greece - 1999; Hong Kong - 2005, 2013; Hungary - 1991, 1998, 1999; Iceland - 1984, 1990, 1999; India - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2014; Indonesia - 2001, 2006; Iran - 2003, 2005; Iraq - 2006, 2013; Ireland - 1981, 1990, 1999; Israel - 2001; Italy - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2005; Japan - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010; Jordan - 2007, 2014; Kazakhstan - 2011; Kuwait - 2013; Kyrgyzstan - 2003, 2011; Lativa - 1990, 1996, 1999; Lebanon - 2013; Libya - 2013; Lithuania - 1990, 1997, 1999; Luxembourg - 1999; Macedonia - 1998, 2001; Malaysia - 2006, 2011; Mali - 2007; Malta - 1983, 1991, 1999; Mexico - 1995, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2012; Moldova - 1996, 2006; Montenegro - 1996, 2001; Morocco - 2001, 2007, 2011; Netherlands - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006, 2012; New Zealand - 1998, 2004, 2011; Nigeria - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2011; Northern Ireland - 1981, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Norway - 1990, 1996, 2007; Pakistan - 1997, 2001, 2012; Palestine - 2013; Peru - 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Philippines - 1996, 2001, 2012; Poland - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2012; Portugal - 1990, 1999; Puerto Rico - 1995, 2001; Qatar- 2010; Romania - 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2012; Russia - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Rwanda - 2007, 2012; Saudi Arabia - 2003; Serbia - 1996, 2001, 2006; Singapore - 2002, 2012; Slovakia - 1991, 1998, 1999; Slovenia - 1992, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2011; South Africa - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2013; South Korea - 1980, 1990, 1996, 2001, 2005, 2010; Spain - 1981, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2007, 2011; Sweden - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Switzerland - 1989, 1996, 2007; Taiwan - 1995, 2006, 2012; Tanzania - 2001; Thailand - 2007, 2013; Trinidad and Tobago - 2006, 2010; Turkey - 1990, 1997, 2001, 2007, 2011; Uganda - 2001; Ukraine - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; United Kingdom - 2006 (also see Great Britain and Northern Ireland); United States - 1982, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, 2011; Uruguay - 1996, 2006, 2011; Uzbekistan - 2011; Venezuela - 1996, 2000; Vietnam - 2001, 2006; Yemen - 2013; Zambia - 2007; and Zimbabwe - 2001, 2011.

  • World Wealth and Income Database
    Provides distribution of top incomes and wealth for many nations.

    This page last updated: October 21, 2009