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Finding Data: Data on Social Attitudes & Values - Non USA

ACCESS TO THESE DATA FILES ARE RESTRICTED TO CURRENTLY ENROLLED/EMPLOYED MEMBERS OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.

  • Afrobarometer
    Independent, nonpartisan research project that measures the social, political and economic atmosphere in Africa. During Round I (July 1999-June 2001), Afrobarometer surveys were conducted in 12 countries. Round 2 surveys were conducted from May 2002 through October 2003 in 16 countries. (Zimbabwe survey was carried out in April & May 2004). Round 3 surveys were conducted in 18 countries from March 2005 through February 2006. Round 4 surveys took place in 20 countries between March 2008 and June 2009. Round 5 surveys took place in 35 countries between 2011 and September 2013. Round 6 surveys began in March 2014. Survey microdata is released to the public 2 years after the first publication of a survey's results. The official site may be more up to date and includes an online analysis tool. See the coverage by country chart.

    Sample Size: Generally, 1,200 or 2,400 adult citizens in each participating country.

  • Arab Barometer
    Multi-country social survey designed to assess citizen attitudes about public affairs, governance, and social policy in the Arab world, and to identify factors that shape these attitudes and values. Seeks public opinion on such topics as: support for democratic institutions, political interest and participation, attitudes toward terrorism and political violence, conceptions and interpretations of Islam, the relationship between religion and politics, and attitudes toward Middle East international relations. ICPSR has 2006-2007, 2010-2011, and 2012-2014.

  • Asia Europe Survey (ASES): A Multinational Comparative Study in 18 Countries, 2001
    Purpose was to study, in 18 countries of Asia and Europe, how democracy (or quasi-democracy) functions in response to various domestic and international stimuli, with a focus on the rise of civil society and the deepening of globalization. Covers generally five topics: (1) identity, (2) trust, (3) satisfaction, (4) beliefs and actions, and (5) socio-economic attributes.

    Sample Size: Adults aged 18-79 living in Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Germany, Sweden, Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Greece.

  • AsiaBarometer
    Microdata for 2003-2007 has been released. Note: ICPSR only has 2003 and 2004.

  • Assessing Happiness and Competitiveness of World Major Metropolises, 2006
    Aimed to empirically examine happiness and community/city conditions assessed by residents living in 10 major cities of the world: Beijing, Berlin, London, Milan, New York City, Paris, Seoul, Stockholm, Tokyo, and Toronto. Respondents were asked questions about themselves and their city of residence. Questions focused on a range of topics including the economy, culture and education, welfare, safety, environment, living conditions, city administration, community life, health, and happiness. Demographic questions included city of residence, gender, age, education level, income level, occupation, marital status, and religion.

  • Attitudes in Russia to Social and Political Aspects of Human Trafficking, 2007
    Collected representative data across Russian regions on attitudes to human trafficking. Since the collapse of the Soviet state, thousands of Russian citizens have been trafficked out of the country as exploited labour, sex slaves, domestic labour, and beggars. Explored beliefs concerning the origins, nature and extent of human trafficking, and attitudes on what the Russian government should do to address the problem. Captured attitudes on how the state should aid the trafficked and the perceived efficacy of different institutions in dealing with trafficking. It also sought responses on how families should help or not help the trafficked; beliefs on the place of a woman in society, and attitudes towards prostitution.

  • Berman Jewish Data Bank
    Repository for demographic and other quantitative social scientific surveys about Jews in the United States and Canada. Archives the National Jewish Population Surveys as well as a number of community surveys.

  • British Social Attitudes Survey Series (1983+)
    Began in 1983, and has been conducted every year since, except in 1988 and 1992. Designed to produce annual measures of attitudinal shifts. For the latest, use the UKDA. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA. Also see British Social Attitudes Surveys, 1983-2012,

  • Carnegie Middle East Governance and Islam Dataset, 1988-2014
    Includes both individual-level and country-level variables. Data on individual-level variables are drawn from 56 surveys carried out in 14 Arab countries, Turkey, and Iran. Taken together, a total of 82,489 men and women were surveyed. Most of the surveys were carried out either as the first, second, and third wave of the Arab Barometer, the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth waves of the World Values Survey, or a project on attitudes related to governance carried out by Mark Tessler with funding from the National Science Foundation. The dataset also includes 4 earlier surveys, as well as variables based on 34 time-specific country-level characteristics, for example, Freedom House political freedom ratings; labor force attributes compiled by the World Bank, the United Nations and others; natural resource rents, also compiled by the World Bank; ratings on the United Nations Human Development Index; freedom of religion indices developed by the United States Department of State; and linguistic, ethnic and religious fractionalization indices compiled in a private research project. Demographic variables include age, sex, education, employment status, marital status, religion, and income.

  • Caucasus Barometer
    In order to increase the cross-comparison of regional social and economic dynamics, the Caucacus Research Resource Centers (CRRC) began a coordinated data collection effort in the fall of 2003 to obtain reliable, comparable data on household knowledge, attitudes and practices across the South Caucasus. The CRRC teams in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia have been collecting data in the South Caucasus on an annual basis since 2004. Although the 2004 DI survey was initially carried out only in the 3 capital cities, the 2005 DI also included one region in each country. Since 2006, the survey has been carried out nationwide, in both urban and rural areas. Requires free registration.

  • CEAP data
    Survey of racial and other social attitudes in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. As the Program Officer with the Ford Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Edward Telles was responsible for funding both the CEAP and PESB 2000 data collection projects.

  • Central and Eastern Eurobarometer Survey Series (CEEB) (1990-1997)
    Began in 1990, when nationally representative surveys were undertaken on behalf of the European Commission in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, and the Soviet Union. Explored individuals' attitudes toward democratic and economic reform, were carried out in the autumn of each year through 1997 in up to 20 countries of the region. An extension of the Eurobarometer series conducted semi-annually in the member nations of the European Union (EU), the Central and Eastern Eurobarometers also focused on public support for the EU and on other issues facing Europe as a whole. After the 1st wave of research, the number of countries was variably expanded to reflect then-current political alignments and realities of access for survey researchers. In each of the countries surveyed, approximately 1,000 persons aged 15 and over were interviewed in their own homes.

  • Chilean CERC Study
    Conducted by Carlos Huneeus, and corresponding to the years 1987 to 2005. Includes 56 barometer studies including questions about the political and economical Chilean actuality.

  • Chinese General Social Survey (China GSS) (2003+)
    Annual or biannual questionnaire survey of China's urban and rural households aiming to monitor systematically the changing relationship between social structure and quality of life in urban and rural China. So far only 2003 data has been released. Registration is required.

  • Class Structure and Class Consciousness: Merged Multi-Nation File (1980-1983)
    Measures how such social concepts as authority, autonomy, and hierarchy relate to the social, economic, and occupational positions of individuals, thus providing a systematic means for analyzing social class structure. Addressed work-related issues such as supervision, decision-making, autonomy, respondent's formal position in the hierarchy, ownership, credentials, and income. Other work- related data describe the size, industrial sector, and government or corporate linkages of the individual's employer. Further information was gathered on the class origins of the respondent's family and of the families of the respondent's spouse and friends. Data on class-related experiences such as unemployment and union participation were also collected, as well as data on the division of power and labor in the household. In addition, contained a broad range of questions on social and political attitudes and on the respondent's political participation. Universe: USA: 18 & older working, not working but wanting to work, or housewives with working spouses. Sweden: 18-65 in the work force. Norway: 16-66 employed, unemployed, or housewives. Canada: Non-institutionalized & non-disabled 15-65 employed, unemployed or housewives. Finland: 18-65 employed, unemployed or housewives.

  • CPoll - Canadian Poll DataBank
    Module of Roper Ipoll. 3 years of survey data are included in this prototype database: 1995, 2000, and 2005. These years combine to create a database of approximately 2,000 questions and topline responses. Data is from Gallup and IPSOS Reid, previously The Angus Reid Group. Tracks social, economic, and political issues in Canada including: education, health care, morals, and racial and sexual discrimination, inflation, personal spending, unemployment, and wage and price controls, ratings of leaders, Parliament, political parties and election coverage, and Canada's role in the world.

  • Data Folha Survey of Racial Attitudes of 1995
    Survey of racial attitudes and perceptions in Brazil.

  • East Asian Social Survey (EASS), (2006+)
    Biennial social survey project that serves as a cross-national network of 4 General Social Survey type surveys in East Asia -- the Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), the Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), the Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), and the Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS). EASS focuses on questions and issues that are commonly relevant to East Asian societies, with the goal of creating comparative data on diverse aspects of social lives in East Asia. Each year and corresponding survey topical module has a specific focus within the general scope of the EASS; module topics cover family, culture, health, and social capital.

  • East-Asian Barometer (2001+)
    Comparative survey of attitudes and values toward politics, power, reform, democracy and citizens' political actions in East Asia.

  • Eurobarometer Survey Series. 1970+
    Large set of surveys measuring public opinion in the countries of the European Union, on a wide variety of topics. Also see the Mannheim Eurobarometer Trend File. Eurobarometer Question and Variable Search allows one to find if and when a topic was covered on the Eurobarometer surveys. Also includes a topical guide. Also see GESIS-ZACAT which includes a large number of EuroBarometer surveys and others and allows online analysis as well as access to microdatafiles (free registration is required).

  • European Quality of Life Survey (2003+)
    Representative, questionnaire-based household survey series. Represents an ambitious attempt to explore quality of life in a wide range of European countries. It is a major source of information, highlighting the challenges the EU faces in the light of recent enlargement. Enables an accurate picture of the social situation in the enlarged EU to be drawn, a picture that includes both objective and subjective elements. At the same time, it should be noted that there are some limitations to the data. While the sample sizes of around 1,000 per country provide a general population profile, they are too small to allow for detailed analysis of sub-groups, such as immigrants or single-parent families. Furthermore, although the wide range of topics covered by the survey is on the one hand a clear advantage, it also means that none of the topics could be treated in great depth. Some of the dimensions are measured with a narrower set of indicators than one would use in highly specialised surveys. However, the strength of the survey is that it provides a synthesis of information on the main aspects of quality of life, both objective and subjective. Residents aged 18 and over in 27 EU countries (as of 2011) as well as Croatia (second and third round), Norway (second round), Iceland, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia (all third round) and Turkey (all 3 rounds). To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • European Social Survey (ESS)
    Biennial multi-country survey covering over 30 nations. The1st round was fielded in 2002/2003, the 7th in 2014.

  • European Values Survey
    Explores the basic human values underlying European social and political institutions. 4 waves have been conducted (1st: 1981-1983; 2nd: 1989-1993; 3rd: 1999-2001; 4th: 2008-2010).
      Participants and waves included:
    • All: Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Iceland, Ireland, Italy. Malta, Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Spain, Sweden
    • 1-2: Canada, USA
    • 1, 2, 4: Norway
    • 2-4: Austria, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia-Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia
    • 3-4: Belarus, Croatia, Greece, Luxembourg, Russian Federation, Turkey, Ukraine
    • 4th: Albania,Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia-Herzegovinia, Cyprus, Georgia, Kosovo. Moldova, Montenegro, Northern Cyprus, Serbia, Switzerland

  • General Household Survey (1971+)
    Continuous national survey of people living in Great Britain in private households conducted on an annual basis. Collects data on a range of core topics, covering household, family and individual information. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • General Social Survey (Canada)
    Surveys from a sample selected across the 10 provinces. The 2 primary objectives are a) to gather data on social trends in order to monitor changes in the living conditions and wellbeing of Canadians over time; and b) to provide immediate information on specific social policy issues of current or emerging interest. Each survey contains a core topic, focus or exploratory questions and a standard set of socio-demographic questions used for classification. More recent cycles have also included some qualitative questions which explore perceptions. For all cycles except Cycle 16, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycle 16 only sampled persons aged 45 and older. Until 1998, the sample size was approximately 10,000 persons. This was increased in 1999 to 25,000.
    Cycle 1, Health and social support, 1985.
    Cycle 2, Time use, social mobility and language use, 1986
    Cycle 3, Personal risk, 1988
    Cycle 4, Education, work and retirement, 1989
    Cycle 5, Family and friends, 1990
    Cycle 6, Health, 1991
    Cycle 7, Time use, 1992
    Cycle 8, Personal risk, 1993
    Cycle 9, Education, work and retirement, 1994
    Cycle 10. Family, 1995
    Cycle 11, Social and community support, 1996
    Cycle 12, Time use, 1998
    Cycle 13, Victimization, 1999
    Cycle 14, Access to and use of information communication, 2000
    Cycle 15, Family history, 2001
    Cycle 16, Aging and social support, 2002
    Cycle 17, Social engagement, 2003
    Cycle 18, Victimization, 2004.
    Cycle 19, Time use, 2005.
    Cycle 20, Family Transitions, 2006.
    Cycle 21, Family, Social Support and Retirement, 2007.
    Cycle 22, Social Networks, 2008.
    Cycle 23, Victimization, 2009.
    Cycle 24, Time-Stress and Well-Being, 2010.
    Cycle 25, Families, 2011.
    Cycle 26, Social Support and Aging, 2012
    Cycle 27, Giving, Volunteering, Participating, 2013
    Cycle 28, Victimization, 2014
    Cycle 29, Time Use, 2015

  • German Social Survey. 1980+
    Monitors social trends in Germany. In addition, each data collection focuses on special topics of investigation. Basic demographic and socioeconomic data also are collected on the respondents, who are German-speaking persons 18 years of age and older living in private households in Germany. Conducted biennially since 1980 (with an additional survey in 1991), the ALLBUS series includes individual survey collections as well as a cumulative file. Cumulative ALLBUS contains variables for all questions administered on at least two different occasions in the framework of the ALLBUS individual studies. Before 1991, respondents were chosen from the Federal Republic of Germany and West Berlin only, and since 1991 from all of Germany. For more recent surveys, see the GESIS site.

  • Global Barometer
    Represents the largest, most careful and systematic comparative survey of attitudes and values toward politics, power, reform, democracy and citizens' political actions in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Arabic region. Based on a common module of questions contained in regional barometer surveys; for additional regional-specific questions, see the original surveys at www.afrobarometer.org, www.arabbarometer.org, www.asianbarometer.org and www.latinobarometro.org. Cross-national comparative surveys have been implemented in 55 political systems -namely Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela, Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Palestine, Algeria, Morocco, Kuwait and Lebanon. In each of the 55 countries or regions, a national research team administers a country-wide face-to-face survey using standardized survey instruments to compile the required micro-level data under a common research framework and research methodology.

  • International Social Justice Project, 1991 and 1996
    The International Social Justice Project is a collaborative effort among 12 countries to conduct a comparative study of popular perceptions of economic and social justice in advanced industrialized nations. The countries participating in the study include Bulgaria, Czech Republic (Czechoslovakia for 1991), Germany (West Germany, and East Germany during its transition toward a democracy), Estonia, Great Britain, Hungary, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, and the United States. Focused on normative social justice concepts such as entitlement, equality of economic opportunity, and reward distribution. Provides analysis of normative justice at a micro level, involving respondents' evaluation of justice or rewards received by individuals and small groups, and at a macro level, through the evaluation of fairness of reward distribution at the aggregate or societal level. Variables in the dataset include demographic characteristics of the respondent, such as age, sex, marital status, education, and occupation, actual and desired income, what factors respondents believe determine level of pay and their fairness, dependence on pension or social welfare programs, satisfaction with the sociopolitical system, perceived and/or preferred role of the government in job allocation, and standard of living.

  • International Social Science Surveys /Australia
    The International Survey Center, an Australian research group, conducts research on social, economic and political issues. Has a few large-scale Australian surveys as well as some secondary datasets from the International Social Survey Program.

  • International Social Survey Program (ISSP) (1985+)
    For the latest see the site's web page. A listing of modules performed as well as plans through 2020 is available (including questionnaires for not-yet-released years). Ongoing program of crossnational collaboration. Develops topical modules dealing with important areas of social science as supplements to regular national surveys. Every survey includes questions about general attitudes toward various social issues such as the legal system, sex, and the economy. Special topics have included the environment, the role of government, social inequality, social support, family and gender issues, work orientation, the impact of religious background, behavior, and beliefs on social and political preferences, and national identity. Participating countries vary for each topical module. Registration is required. 1998-2007 is also available in an easy to use comparative program.

  • Irish Social and Political Attitudes Survey (ISPAS) (2001)
    Conducted in Autumn 2001. Must be requested from the Irish Social Science Data Archive.

  • Israel Social Surveys (2002+)
    Continuing, annual survey on a sample of persons aged 20 and older, integrating factual data, typically collected in other Central Bureau of Statistics surveys, with attitudes regarding these facts. Measures both objective and subjective well-being across time. Each survey questionnaire consists of 2 parts: a set of 200 core questions repeated annually, covering the respondent's situation in the principal areas of social life (family, health, education, work, etc.) and his or her evaluation of their situation, and a variable module which focuses on a different policy-relevant topic each survey year. Data is restricted and must be requested by the researcher.

  • Japanese General Social Surveys (JGSS) (2000-2003, 2005-2006, 2008, 2010, 2012)
    Designed to solicit political, sociological, and economic information from people living in Japan. Conducted once yearly or once in two years.

  • Joint Economic and Social Data Archive
    Includes data from many Russian institutes. Most documentation is in Russian. Summary data and data analysis tools are provided free on the site. For microdata, requests must be sent to the Archive. Wide variety of surveys including ones on reform, economics, social views, culture, politics, religion, labor, scientists, women, and young people.

  • Korean General Social Survey Series (KGSS), 2003-2012
    Respondents were asked for their opinions on Korean society, politics and reunification, economic issues, social equity and inequality, and suicide. Additional questions were asked about the everyday life, household, family, education, occupation, and mental health of the respondents. Demographic information includes age, sex, education level, household income, employment status, religious preference, political party affiliation, and political philosophy.

  • Latinobarometro (1995+)
    Summary level public opinion data for Latin America and Spain. Microdata is also available through 2015 in Stata format. Note: A survey was not conducted in 1999 or 2014.

  • Legislative Behavior in the Israeli Knesset, 1974-1975
    Contains data from personal interviews with 86 members of the 8th Israeli Knesset (1973-1977). Data include members' general perceptions of the legislature and the Israeli political world, as well as their specific party and career histories, areas of expertise, positions held in the Knesset, legislative accomplishments and goals, and legislative behavior, e.g., contact with party leaders, civil servants, and constituents. Other survey data focus on members' political socialization, recruitment, and first political awareness, including the impact of World War II (e.g., concentration camps and purges), elections, Zionism, family activists, school, the Palestine-Israeli conflict, anti-Semitism in community, and membership in youth groups. Personal background data are also included, e.g., age, sex, education, religion, country of origin, family circumstances, and wave (Aliyah) of immigration to Israel.

  • Market for Migrant Domestic and Sex Workers, 2002-2006
    Explored attitudes towards, and experience of, the markets for migrant domestic and sex workers in the Czech Republic, Hong Hong, Spain, Thailand, and the UK through a combination of interview and survey research. Interviews were structured around a standard set of topics, and examined respondents' attitudes towards gender, race/ethnicity, age, and domestic work/commercial sex. It aimed to examine continuities and discontinuities between domestic work and sex work, paying particular attention to the role of the social/cultural imagination in constructing a market for migrant workers and questions about how this demand relates to broader socially tolerated attitudes towards race, gender, age and sexuality, and to make a contribution to current theorizing on gender, nationality, global interdependence, age, racial/ethnic identities and the complex intersections among these systems. Data is only available for Spain and the UK. Other countries were involved in a small pilot. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • New Baltic Barometer (1993+)
    Each survey uses a questionnaire with innovative indicators specially relevant in transition societies: support for democracy and undemocratic alternatives; corruption; attitudes to enlarging Europe; coping with a multiplicity of economies, monetized and non-monetized; relative affluence and destitution; and demographics: age, education, gender, urban/rural residence, etc. Includes Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. For more information, see the CSPP pages.

  • New Europe Barometer (1991+)
    Each survey uses a questionnaire with innovative indicators specially relevant in transition societies: support for democracy and undemocratic alternatives; corruption; attitudes to enlarging Europe; coping with a multiplicity of economies, monetized and non-monetized; relative affluence and destitution; and demographics: age, education, gender, urban/rural residence, etc. Includes Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, Slovenia, Bulgaria, and Romania. For more information, see the CSPP pages.

  • New Russia Barometer (1992+)
    Each survey uses a questionnaire with innovative indicators specially relevant in transition societies: support for democracy and undemocratic alternatives; corruption; attitudes to enlarging Europe; coping with a multiplicity of economies, monetized and non-monetized; relative affluence and destitution; and demographics: age, education, gender, urban/rural residence, etc. Includes Russia, Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine. For more information, see the CSPP pages.

  • Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey (NILT) (1998+)
    Successor to the previous Northern Ireland Social Attitudes series (1989-1996). Monitors public attitudes towards social policy and political issues in Northern Ireland. Originally had a companion series, the Young Life and Times Survey. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • ONS Opinions Survey (1990+)
    Regular, multi-purpose survey for the United Kingdom. Each month's questionnaire consists of 2 elements: core questions, covering demographic information, are asked each month together with non-core questions that vary from month to month. Topical modules have included topics such as changes in family circumstances, contraception use, flexible working and leave arrangements, internet use, attendance and participation in the arts, smoking, social capital needs, and time use. Formerly known as the ONS Omnibus Survey. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • Pattern of Human Concerns Data, 1957-1963
    Of the 14 nations included in the original study, these data cover the following 10: Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Israel, Nigeria, Panama, United States, West Germany, and Yugoslavia. (The data for Egypt, Japan, the Philippines, and Poland are not available through ICPSR.) In India and Israel the interviews were conducted in 2 waves, with different samples. Besides ascertaining the usual personal information, the study employed a "Self-Anchoring Striving Scale," an open-ended scale asking the respondent to define hopes and fears for self and the nation, to determine the two extremes of a self-defined spectrum on each of several variables. After these subjective ratings were obtained, the respondents indicated their perceptions of where they and their nations stood on a hypothetical ladder at three different points in time. Demographic variables include the respondents' age, gender, marital status, and level of education.

  • Pechter Middle East Polls
    Political, economic and social surveys in the Middle East and Muslim portions of South Asia and Africa. Select data is free online.

  • Pesquisa Social Brasileira (PESB) (2002)
    Social Survey for Brazil includes questions on social hierarchy, violence and crime, racial relations, and sexuality and health. As the Program Officer with the Ford Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Edward Telles was responsible for funding both the CEAP and PESB 2000 data collection projects.

  • Polish General Social Survey (PGSS) Series. 1992+
    Ongoing program of research to monitor social trends in Poland and was designed with 3 principal objectives: (1) to provide a systematic, annual measurement of trends (and constants) in the social characteristics and opinions of Polish society, (2) to supply fresh, accurate, and interesting data about Polish society, and (3) to provide data for use in international comparative studies, particularly data on the processes of social change in Poland, for cross-referencing with similar processes in other societies and cultures. Conducted annually from 1992 to 1995 and biennially subsequently, the PGSS series studies individual attitudes, values, orientations, and social behavior, as well as socio-demographic, occupational, educational, and economic differentiation in Poland.

  • Quality of Canadian Life: Social Change in Canada, 1977
    Measures each respondent's descriptions of, attitudes about, and satisfaction with a variety of domains of everyday life. They include: neighborhood/city/town/county of residence, life as a whole, Canadian and provincial governments, work and housework, personal finances, housing, life goals and values, personal alienation and efficacy, leisure activities and spare time, education, health and physical condition, friendships, marriage and romantic relationships, children, current Canadian political and social issues, and the news media. Background information and interviewer's observational data are also included.

  • Scottish Social Attitudes Survey (1999+)
    Based on annual rounds of interviews with around 1,500 people drawn using random probability sampling, its aims are to facilitate the study of public opinion and inform the development of public policy in Scotland. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • Social Determinants of Voting in Sweden, 1964
    Created primarily for teaching purposes, enabling students to replicate original analyses but also to explore the usefulness of alternative modes of analysis or to test alternative hypotheses. The data were collected from a representative sample of the Swedish electorate at the time of the 1964 Riksdag election in Sweden. Variables ascertained the respondents' voting behavior, party affiliation, and interest in politics. Demographic information includes level of education, occupation, socioeconomic stratum, social mobility, membership in labor unions, and frequency of church attendance, as well as sex, age, and marital status. In order to facilitate the use of the data for instructional purposes, several summary classifications and variables in collapsed versions were included in the dataset.

    Sample Size: Representative sample, drawn from official population registers.

  • Social Weather Stations Survey (1995-1997, 2003)
    Independent source of data on Philippine economic and social conditions. Respondents were queried about such topics as needs and aspirations, education, employment, satisfaction on certain aspects of life, activities and involvement, experience of discrimination, and religiosity.

  • Survey of Soviet Values, 1990
    Contains survey information from parts of the former Soviet Union located in Europe: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Belorussia, Ukraine, Moldavia, Georgia, Armenia, and Russia west of the Ural Mountains. Designed to assess respondents' commitment to democratic values and rates of political participation of the Soviet mass public. Major topics covered include conventional and unconventional political participation, political tolerance, support for democratic elections, support for pluralistic media, rights consciousness, anti-Semitism, and support for market institutions.

  • Survey Research Data Archive at Academia Sinica, Taiwan
    Large archive housing a number of Taiwan research studies including the Social Image Survey in Taiwan and Taiwan's Election and Democratization Studies, TEDS.

    Application must be made directly to the center for permission to use the data, and should be done well in advance of a project's due date. Also, be aware that English documentation is not available in all cases.

  • Taiwan Social Change Survey (1985, 1994, 1999, 2004, 2009)
    Tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. 2009 is separate.

  • Time Use Survey 1999/2000 [Palestine]
    Presents data on the time spent on the various activities such as work activities inside or outside establishments, housework, household care activities, voluntary activities, educational activities, cultural and social activities, mass media use, and personal care. Also, provides data on the percentage of individuals who carried out such activities, and average time spent on carrying out such activities for those who practiced. In addition, this survey sheds light on the social environment surrounding the individual while practicing such activities, including participants, place of activity, and means of transportation used in carrying out the activity.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Brazil, 1964
    Surveyed a sample of university engineering students in Brazil to give a picture of social, economic, political, and psychological aspects of university life. Educational background information was obtained through extensive questions about the respondents' secondary school education and subjects studied, as well as the levels of education that both their parents and grandparents had achieved. Respondents were further queried about the function of the university and the best qualities of the professors. One portion of the survey probed the respondents' attitudes and outlook on life: the importance of maintaining family ties, acceptance of authority, moral responsibility, and the negative aspects of human nature as evidenced in wars and political corruption. The respondents' interest in national and international affairs was explored through variables concerning politics, political parties, and internationally known heads of state. Demographic information includes age and marital status.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Colombia, 1964
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, gender, marital status, and occupation, if applicable.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Mexico, 1962
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Panama, 1964
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • University Students' Values, Vocations, and Political Orientations: Uruguay, 1966
    Respondents' educational backgrounds were explored through extensive questions about their secondary school attendance and the level of education attained by their parents and grandparents. The value that students placed on education and on the university in general was examined in variables probing the importance of completing a degree, the main functions of an academic institution, and the respondents' professional prospects and expectations after graduation. Other questions elicited the respondents' views on faculty and student involvement in politics. A major portion of the study assessed the students' perspectives on national and international affairs. Respondents gave their opinions about specific issues affecting their country, such as agrarian reform, the role of the national government, the benefits of foreign capital, and the advantages of joining the Latin American Free Trade Association. Further variables explored the students' views on international issues, such as the Cuban Revolution and aspects of the social, economic, and cultural development of several world powers. Finally, several questions probed the respondents' perspectives on life, social relations and family ties, and moral and religious matters, as well as their tendencies toward progressive political thinking. Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, number of siblings, religion, and occupation, if applicable.

  • Voice of the People Series (2005+)
    Annual survey to solicit public opinion on social and political issues. Every year the survey will be conducted in approximately 50 countries, with a minimal sample size of 500 per country. Wherever possible, within each country a nationally representative sample n=500 adults, male and female, aged 18 and older will be used. In some emergent countries, where such research conditions are not possible, there may be stated variations to this (e.g. urban areas only). Similarly, in the developed world interviews will be conducted by telephone, while in emergent and under-developed countries face to face interviews will be conducted. Demographic variables include sex, age, household income, education level, employment status, and religious preference.

  • World Database of Happiness: States of Nations
    Includes summary information from social surveys indicating levels of happiness in about 95 countries around the world, along with data on possible causal factors. Includes state level measures for the USA.

  • World Values Survey (WVS)
    Designed to enable a crossnational comparison of values and norms on a wide variety of topics and to monitor changes in values and attitudes across the globe. A variety of questions on religion and morality were included. Coverage includes: Albania - 1998, 2002; Algeria - 2002, 2014; Andorra - 2005; Argentina - 1991, 1995, 1999, 2006, 2013; Armenia - 1997, 2011; Australia - 1995, 2005, 2012; Austria - 1990, 1999; Azerbaijan - 1997, 2011-2012; Bahrain (2014); Bangladesh - 1996, 2002; Belarus - 1996, 2000, 2011; Belgium - 1981, 1990, 1999; Bosnia and Herzegovinia - 1998, 2001; Brazil - 1990, 1997, 2006, 2014; Bulgaria - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2006; Burkina Faso - 2007; Canada - 1982, 1990, 2000, 2006; Chile - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2006; China - 1990, 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Colombia - 1998, 2005, 2012; Croatia - 1996, 1999; Cyprus - 2006, 2011; Czech Republic - 1991, 1998, 1999; Denmark - 1981, 1990, 1999; Dominican Republic - 1998; Ecuador - 2013; Egypt - 2000, 2008, 2012; El Salvador - 1999; Estonia - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2011; Ethiopia - 2007; Finland - 1990, 1996, 2000, 2005; France - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006; Georgia - 1996, 2008, 2014; Germany - 2006, 2013; Germany East - 1990, 1997; Germany West - 1981, 1990, 1997; Ghana - 2007, 2011; Great Britain - 1981, 1990, 1998, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Greece - 1999; Hong Kong - 2005, 2013; Hungary - 1991, 1998, 1999; Iceland - 1984, 1990, 1999; India - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2014; Indonesia - 2001, 2006; Iran - 2003, 2005; Iraq - 2006, 2013; Ireland - 1981, 1990, 1999; Israel - 2001; Italy - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2005; Japan - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010; Jordan - 2007, 2014; Kazakhstan - 2011; Kuwait - 2013; Kyrgyzstan - 2003, 2011; Lativa - 1990, 1996, 1999; Lebanon - 2013; Libya - 2013; Lithuania - 1990, 1997, 1999; Luxembourg - 1999; Macedonia - 1998, 2001; Malaysia - 2006, 2011; Mali - 2007; Malta - 1983, 1991, 1999; Mexico - 1995, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2012; Moldova - 1996, 2006; Montenegro - 1996, 2001; Morocco - 2001, 2007, 2011; Netherlands - 1981, 1990, 1999, 2006, 2012; New Zealand - 1998, 2004, 2011; Nigeria - 1990, 1995, 2000, 2011; Northern Ireland - 1981, 1999 (also see United Kingdom); Norway - 1990, 1996, 2007; Pakistan - 1997, 2001, 2012; Palestine - 2013; Peru - 1995, 2001, 2006, 2012; Philippines - 1996, 2001, 2012; Poland - 1990, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2012; Portugal - 1990, 1999; Puerto Rico - 1995, 2001; Qatar- 2010; Romania - 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2012; Russia - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Rwanda - 2007, 2012; Saudi Arabia - 2003; Serbia - 1996, 2001, 2006; Singapore - 2002, 2012; Slovakia - 1991, 1998, 1999; Slovenia - 1992, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2011; South Africa - 1990, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2013; South Korea - 1980, 1990, 1996, 2001, 2005, 2010; Spain - 1981, 1990, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2007, 2011; Sweden - 1990, 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; Switzerland - 1989, 1996, 2007; Taiwan - 1995, 2006, 2012; Tanzania - 2001; Thailand - 2007, 2013; Trinidad and Tobago - 2006, 2010; Turkey - 1990, 1997, 2001, 2007, 2011; Uganda - 2001; Ukraine - 1996, 1999, 2006, 2011; United Kingdom - 2006 (also see Great Britain and Northern Ireland); United States - 1982, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, 2011; Uruguay - 1996, 2006, 2011; Uzbekistan - 2011; Venezuela - 1996, 2000; Vietnam - 2001, 2006; Yemen - 2013; Zambia - 2007; and Zimbabwe - 2001, 2011.

  • World Values Survey in Armenia (September 2011 to January 2012)
    CRRC-Armenia has completed its data collection in connection with the World Values Survey (WVS) in September-October, 2011. These survey results will give researchers, social scientists and public policy makers insight into the values, beliefs and motivations of Armenians and how these factors have both changed over time and how they compare with other societies throughout the world. This standardized questionnaire, given to a representational national sample of 1,100 Armenian residents, measured the values of Armenians with respect to a number of issues. With over 250 questions covering a variety of aspects of a respondent's economic, political and social life, the WVS-Armenia project hopes to not only stimulate debate about the changes seen since the last time WVS was given in Armenia (1997), but to also give researchers and social scientists data that can be compared with other countries from around the world. The WVS has carried out representational national surveys in 97 societies containing almost 90% of the world's population.

  • Young People's Behaviour and Attitudes Survey (YPBAS) (2000+)
    School-based survey carried out among 11-16 year olds and covers a wide range of topics relevant to the lives of young people today such as school, nutrition, sports, smoking, alcohol, solvents, drugs, policing, personal safety, sexual experience and knowledge, relationships, the environment and travelling to school. Conducted every 3 years. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

  • Young People's Social Attitudes (YPSA) (1994, 1998, 2003)
    Offshoot of the British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA) . Designed to explore the attitudes and values of children and young people and make comparisons with those held by adults. All young people aged 12-19 living in the households of BSA respondents were approached for interview. To obtain a free account please register with the UKDA.

This page last updated: October 21, 2009